Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the Roman Republic

Julius Caesar, Imperator and Dictator, October 49 - 15 March 44 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Minted after his invasion of Italy and crossing of the Rubicon on 10 January 49 B.C. until his defeat of Pompey at Pharsalus, this was the first coin type issued in Caesar's name. The elephant was the symbol of the Caesar family. According to legend, an ancestor received the name Caesar after single-handedly killing an elephant, probably in North Africa during the first Punic War, and "Caesai" was the name for elephant in the local Punic language. The obverse was long described as an elephant trampling a snake, symbolizing good triumphing over evil. For the Romans, however, the snake was a symbol of healing, not evil. The image to the right (click it to see a larger photo) is ornamentation on the side of the Gundestrup cauldron (c. 150 - 1 B.C.) depicting three Celtic warriors sounding their carnyx war trumpets. Clearly, Caesar's elephant is trampling a carnyx and the obverse symbolizes Caesar's victory over the Celtic tribes of Gaul. The reverse refers to Caesar's office of Pontifex Maximus, the high priest of Rome, a title now held by the Pope.Persian Empire

RS92156. Silver denarius, Crawford 443/1, Sydenham 1006, RSC I 49, Sear CRI 9, BMCRR Gaul 27, Russo RBW 1557, SRCV I 1399, F, toned, light bumps and marks, reverse a little off center, weight 3.570 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, military mint, traveling with Caesar, 49 B.C.; obverse elephant walking right trampling on a carnyx (Celtic war trumpet) ornamented to look like a dragon, CAESAR below; reverse implements of the pontificate: culullus (cup) or simpulum (ladle), aspergillum (sprinkler), securis (sacrificial ax), and apex (priest's hat); $600.00 (528.00)


Luceria, Apulia, Italy, c. 211 - 200 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
In 321 B.C., the Romans, deceived into thinking Lucera was under siege by the Samnites, walked into an ambush and were defeated. The town threw out the Samnites, sought Roman protection, and in 320 B.C. was granted the status of Colonia Togata, which meant it was ruled by the Roman Senate. To strengthen ties, 2,500 Romans moved to Lucera. Roman culture merged with the native one slowly, probably accompanied by cross-cultural marriages, but Lucera was a steadfast supporter of Rome. By the 2nd century B.C., the rustic town was transformed into a proper Roman city with houses, public buildings, paved roads, sidewalks and services for travelers, accommodation for livestock with running water, and warehouses for storing goods.
GB86125. Bronze uncia, SNG ANS 709; SNG Cop 663; SNG BnF 1368; SNG Mnchen 504; HN Italy 682; BMC Italy p. 141, 62; Hunterian -, VF, rough, weight 4.084 g, maximum diameter 14.9 mm, die axis 0o, Luceria mint, c. 211 - 200 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, bow and quiver at shoulder, pellet behind; reverse LOVC-ERI, toad seen from above; very rare; $480.00 (422.40)


Mark Antony, Triumvir and Imperator, 44 - 30 B.C., Struck by Octavian

Click for a larger photo
According to Livy, the caduceus, a symbol of peace, was sometimes carried by diplomats sent to negociate a treaty. Antony and Octavian allied to defeat Caesar's assassins, but after defeating Brutus and Cassius, each was determined to obtain absolute power. While Antony was in Egypt, his brother and his wife gathered an army to remove Octavian but they were defeated. Antony and Octavian met with their armies at Brundisium, but the legions, both Caesarian, refused to fight. The two men reached an agreement. This is when this coin was struck by Octavian's mint with Antony's portrait on the obverse. It appeared that peace was finally reigning in the Roman world, but it only was a short calm before another storm.
RR89740. Silver denarius, Crawford 529/3, Sydenham 1328, Sear CRI 303, BMCRR II Gaul 94, Russo RBW 1817, RSC I Mark Antony 5, F, uneven toning, light marks, weight 3.488 g, maximum diameter 20.7 mm, die axis 270o, travelling mint with Octavian mint, 39 B.C.; obverse ANTONIVS IMP, bare head right; reverse CAESAR - IMP (counterclockwise below), winged caduceus; rare; $450.00 (396.00)


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Tarpeia was daughter of the commander of the citadel in Rome. She offered to open the gates for the besieging Sabines, if they would give her what they wore on their left arms, meaning their gold bracelets. The Sabines were unable to enter the citadel; its open gates were miraculously protected by boiling jets of water created by Janus. Keeping their promise, the Sabines threw the shields they worn on their left arms upon Tarpeia, crushing her to death, and then they kicked her off a cliff. This myth was likely used to explain the Tarpeian Rock, a cliff on the Capitoline Hill from which murderers and traitors were thrown.
RS93566. Silver denarius, RIC I 299, RSC I 494, BMCRE I 29, BnF I 157, SRCV I 1639, VF, toned, flow lines, minor porosity, pleasing example of the type, weight 3.386 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, moneyer P. Petronius Turpilianus, 19 - 18 B.C.; obverse CAESAR AVGVSTVS, bare head right; reverse TVRPILIANVS III VIR, Tarpeia standing facing, wearing tunic, raising both hands, buried to her waist under ten shields, broken spear below; Stack's Bowers ANA Auction (14 Aug 2019), lot 22100; rare; $400.00 (352.00)


Roman Republic, Q. Pomponius Musa, 66 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Many of the Roman moneyers had a solid sense of humor and word play with homonyms was very popular. Pomponius Musa, playing on his name, issued ten types each depicting Hercules Musagetes (Conductor of the Muses) or one of nine different Muses, creating one of the most interesting and sought after series of the Republican coinage. This coin depicts Melpomene, the muse of Tragedy.
RR89043. Silver denarius, RSC I Pomponia 14, Crawford 410/4, Sydenham 816, SRCV I 354, VF, attractive head of Apollo, light toning, light marks, off center, some encrustation, weight 3.453 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 66 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right, scepter behind; reverse Melpomene, muse of tragedy, standing left, resting right hand on club, tragic mask in left, MVSA downward on left, Q POMPONI downward on right; ex Harlan J. Berk auction 156, lot 242; $380.00 (334.40)


Roman Republic, M. Tullius, 120 B.C.

Click for a larger photo
The wreath might represent an eclipse that occurred on 11 November 120 B.C., which the Romans declared indicated divine support for their recent victories in southern France. The reverse more likely commemorates the victories of Servius Tullius, the moneyer's ancestor, over the Sabines. He was the first Roman to be awarded the laurel wreath. The mark of value (X) on the reverse is very unusual.
RR92757. Silver denarius, SRCV I 155, Sydenham 531, Crawford 280/1, RSC I Tullia 1, Choice aEF, beautiful style, attractive iridescent toning, light marks, weight 3.924 g, maximum diameter 19.7 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 120 B.C.; obverse helmeted head of Roma right, ROMA behind; reverse Victory in a quadriga right, reins in both hands, palm frond in left, wreath above, X below, MTVLLI in exergue; $350.00 (308.00)


Roman Republic, M. Junius Brutus (Q. Caepio Brutus), 54 B.C., Ancient Counterfeit

Click for a larger photo
M. Junius Brutus (also called Q. Caepio Brutus) is the most famous of Caesars assassins. Many of Brutus' coins honor his ancestors and illustrate his strong republican views. The obverse honors L. Junius Brutus, the consul who in 509 B.C. forced the expulsion of the Tarquin Kings from Rome and founded the Republic. The reverse honors Gaius Servilius Ahala, who threw Spurius Maelius down from the Tarpeian rock to his death for plotting against the Republic and aspiring to tyranny. Caesar should not have been surprised by Brutus!
RR91685. Fouree silver plated denarius, cf. RSC I Junia 30, Sydenham 907, Crawford 433/2, BMCRR I Rome 3864, Russo RBW 1543, SRCV I 398 (official Roman prototype, silver, Rome mint), VF, deep old cabinet toning, scratches, minor encrustations, small plating breaks and one larger 9:00 on obverse, weight 3.087 g, maximum diameter 19.4 mm, die axis 0o, unofficial counterfeiter's mint, c. 54 - 50 B.C.; obverse bearded bare head of L. Junius Brutus (consul 509 B.C.), BRVTVS downward behind; reverse bearded bare head of C. Servilius Ahala (master of the horse 439 B.C.), AHALA downward behind; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $250.00 (220.00)


Geto-Dacian, Roman Republic Imitative, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In ancient Greek and Roman writing Dacus (plural Daci) and Geta (plural Getae) were interchangeable names for tribes of the Dacia region, distinct from but influenced by and possibly related the Thracians and Celts. Modern historians prefer to use the name Geto-Dacians.
CE93052. Silver imitative denarius, Davis website -, Davis Apvlvm -, Davis-Paunov -, et al. -; for the Rome mint prototypes see: Crawford 363/1 (obv.) and Crawford 379/2 (rev.), VF, crude, light toning, die wear/rust, a little off center and uneven strike with some weak areas, weight 2.990 g, maximum diameter 18.1 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 82 B.C. - 1st Century A.D.; obverse laureate head of Apollo right (various possible prototypes, perhaps copied from Roman Republic, L. Marcius Censorinus, 82 B.C., silver denarius, Crawford 363/1) ; reverse Juno Sospita in a biga right, brandishing spear and holding shield, snake below, L.PROCILI.F in exergue (copied from Roman Republic, L. Procilius L.f., 80 B.C., silver denarius serratus, Crawford 379/2); apparently unpublished, we were unable to find another example of this hybrid imitative type; extremely rare; $240.00 (211.20)


Roman Republic, Fragment of an Aes Formatum Large Domed Disc Ingot, 4th Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
Called aes formatum by Haeberlin, this very rare bronze currency was a precursor to the issues of aes grave but later than aes rude. Presumably, molten bronze-iron alloy was poured into a shallow hole in the dirt. This left a disc-shaped metal mound with a flat reverse. Broken examples like this one are much more common than complete ones.
RR86151. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. Haeberlin p. 4, pl. 2.7; fragment, weight 199.40 g, maximum diameter 66.1 mm, Italian mint, 4th century B.C.; obverse convex obverse; reverse flat reverse; rare; $180.00 (158.40)


Osco-Latin, Central Italy, Late 4th - Early 3rd Century B.C.

Click for a larger photo
 
GA90996. Cast bronze Aes Formatum, cf. G. Fallai, IAPN 8, pl. 6, 2-2e; Alvarez-Burgos P28; Thurlow-Vecchi -; molded from bipod shell, VF, weight 12.046 g, maximum diameter 26.5 mm, uncertain Osco-Latin mint, late 4th - early 3rd century B.C.; $180.00 (158.40)




  






REFERENCES|

Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Grueber, H.A. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Haeberlin, E. J. Aes Grave. Das Schwergeld Roms und Mittelitaliens. (Frankfurt, 1910).
Rutter, N.K. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H.A., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. R. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49 - 27 BC. (London, 1998).
Sear, D. R. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Stannard, C. The local coinages of Central Italy in the late Roman Republic: provisional catalogue, Oct 2007.
Sydenham, E. Aes Grave, a Study of the Cast Coinages of Rome and Central Italy. (London, 1926).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).
Thurlow, B. and I. Vecchi. Italian Cast Coinage. (Dorchester, 1979).

Catalog current as of Tuesday, September 17, 2019.
Page created in 6.5 seconds.
Roman Republic