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Antiquities

Roman Republic, Lead Glandes Sling-Bullet, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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According to the contemporary report of Vegatius, Republican slingers had an accurate range of up to six hundred feet. The best sling ammunition was cast from lead. For a given mass, lead, being very dense, offered the minimum size and therefore minimum air resistance. Also, lead sling-bullets were small and difficult to see in flight. In some cases, the lead would be cast in a simple open mold made by pushing a finger, thumb, or sharpened stick into sand and pouring molten metal into the hole. The flat top end was carved to a matching point after the lead cooled. More frequently, they were cast in two-part molds. Sling-bullets were made in a variety of shapes including an ellipsoidal form closely resembling an acorn; possibly the origin of the Latin word for lead sling-bullet: glandes plumbeae (literally leaden acorns) or simply glandes (meaning acorns, singular glans). The most common shape by far was biconical, resembling the shape of an almond or an American football. Why the almond shape was favored is unknown. Possibly there was some aerodynamic advantage, but it seems equally likely that there was a more prosaic reason, such as the shape being easy to extract from a mold, or that it will rest in a sling cradle with little danger of rolling out. Almond-shaped lead sling-bullets were typically about 35 millimeters (1.4 in) long and about 20 millimeters (0.8 in) wide. Sometimes symbols or writings were molded on the side. A thunderbolt, a snake, a scorpion, or others symbols indicating how it might strike without warning were popular. Writing might include the name of the military unit or commander, or was sometimes more imaginative, such as, "Take this," "Ouch," "Catch," or even "For Pompey's backside."
AW66458. Lead glandes sling-bullet; cf. Petrie XLIV 15-23; roughly biconical, without symbols or inscriptions, c. 40 - 90 grams, c. 3 - 5 cm long, one sling-bullet randomly selected from the same group as those in the photo, ONE BULLET, BARGAIN PRICED!; $20.00 (17.60)


Greek, Hellenistic Alexandrian Egypt, Marble Head of Zeus, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years. Ex Jerome Eisenberg, 1970.
AM35512. Marble head of Zeus; 4 x 4 inches; elegantly proportioned, Very attractive, large slightly almond shaped eyes looking ahead, straight nose (part is worn off), beard above and below the mouth; ears not present, some yellowing and brown, on black wood mount; of great rarity; $1700.00 (1496.00)


Egyptian, Beaded Horus Falcon and Kebhsenuf Funerary Ornaments, Ptolemaic Period, 304 - 30 B.C.

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From the collection of Alex G. Malloy, former dealer in antiquities for 40 years.

These beaded Horus Falcon and Qebehsenuef funerary ornaments were likely placed on the chest of a mummy sheathed in strands of blue faience beads.
AZ33396. Colorful beaded funerary ornament; Alex G. Malloy, Ancient Art and Antiquities, Summer 1977, 17, intact with original strings, Superb, 7 " Horus Falcon with crowned head and spread wings, with pairs of 3 " Qebehsenuef, brightly colored turquoise blue, maroon, white yellow, and black beads faience beads; $1400.00 (1232.00)


Roman, Eastern Mediterranean, Glass Double Balsamarium (Cosmetic Tube), 4th Century A.D.

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This type was used to store eye makeup. One tube would have held kohl, a black paste made with powdered galena. The other tube would have held another color, perhaps made with an ochre clay (for red or brown) or powdered malachite (for green or blue).
AG20799. cf. Yale Gallery 323, Oppenlnder 680a, ROM Glass 458, Corning II 749, Choice, complete and intact, weathering and iridescence, double balsamarium, free-blown thick heavy pale translucent blue-green glass, 20.0 cm (8") tall, two tubes joined side-by-side and sharing a thick globular bottom, applied top "basket" handle attached to applied loop on each side; from the Robert H. Cornell collection, former dealer in Eastern antiquities for 40 years; $1250.00 (1100.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian (Samaria?), Snake-Thread Flask, Late 2nd - Early 4th Century A.D.

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Snake-thread ornamentation originated in the eastern provinces of the Roman Empire in the second half of the second century and its popularity peaked in the first half of the third century. Snake-thread decoration was revived in the second half of the fourth century in the east and in the west near Cologne in modern Germany. Serpentine form trails may vary in thickness, may be the same color as the vessel (usually colorless) or brightly colored (common in the West). Ontario Museum 309, with similar subtle snake-thread ornamentation, is attributed to Samaria, 3rd to early 4th century A.D.

A disadvantage of antiquity photographs is that they usually fail to adequately indicate size. This vessel, nearly 5" tall, is larger than most similar vessels of the period.
AG63814. cf. Ontario Museum 309 (for similar ornamentation), Choice, complete and intact, a well made beautiful flask, some weathering, some iridescence, snake thread flask, 12.4 mm (4 7/8") high, funnel mouth with rolled rim, cylindrical neck, bulbous body, snake-thread ornamentation on the body, flat bottom; from a Florida dealer; $1000.00 (880.00)


Greco-Roman Anatatolia (Smyrna, Ionia?), Terracotta Woman Holding Infant, 2nd century B.C. - 1st century A.D.

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Kourotrophos (Greek: "child nurturer") was an Athenian deity, the protector of children and young people, with a cult and sanctuary, the so-called Kourotropheion. Gods and goddesses, including Athena, Apollo, Hermes, Hecate, Aphrodite, and Artemis, are given the epithet Kourotrophos when depicted holding an infant. Figurines of females holding infants are also called Kourotrophos. The purpose of kourotrophic figurines is debated. Perhaps they are representations of the Athenian goddess. Perhaps they were fertility or childbirth charms. They are found in graves, so perhaps they were companions for the dead.

We were unable to find another example of this type. Attribution to Smyrna, Ionia is based on the color and texture of the clay, and on the style and workmanship.
AH21487. Terracotta kourotrophos statuette of a woman holding a swaddled infant, 25cm (9 7/8") tall, mold-made, hollow and without back, Choice, complete and intact, old dealer labels on the reverse, stands on its own base, Late Hellenistic to Roman Era; $600.00 (528.00)


Hellenistic Greek, Bronze Relief Ring Fragment, Anatolia, 3rd - 2nd Century B.C.

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This bronze ring fragment is nearly identical to the referenced the ring fragment currently in The J. Paul Getty Museum in Malibu, California, listed in Spier Rings, as shown to the right. It is clearly the same woman depicted and they are very likely from the same engraver and workshop. The Getty Museum piece is similarly missing almost the entire hoop.ring fragment
AS72537. Spier Rings 90 (nearly identical fragment!, bezel 21.1 x 17.3 x 4.5 mm), fragment, entire bezel present, only traces of the hoop remain, rough green patina, some corrosion, bezel 22.5 x 18.3 x 4.7 mm, high relief portrait of a woman facing left (perhaps a Ptolemaic queen), draped and wearing her hair in melon coiffure; $550.00 (484.00)


Roman, Bronze Repousse Plaque with Centaur Holding a Bow, Lorica Sqaumata Armor Plate(?), c. 1st - 3rd Century B.C.

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Likely used in some legionary application; perhaps as a lorica squamata legionary armor plate segment.
AA59779. Roman, bronze repousse, 1.75 x 1.75 inches, c. 1st - 3rd century A.D.; sheet bronze hammered from behind in repousse technique to raise the figure of a centaur holding a bow, remains of two rivet holes where it was attached, tear on body, rare and interesting; from a New Jersey collection; $450.00 (396.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Sprinkler Jug, c. 3rd Century A.D.

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This opaque buff-yellow-brown enamel-like weathering is common on glass vessels found in Israel, Lebanon, Jordan and Syria.
AG63811. cf. Lightfoot NMS 178, Ontario Museum 416, Isings -, Complete, tiny chip in handle (visible in photo), possibly a small rim repair or just flaked weathering, thick yellowish brown enamel-like weathering, glass sprinkler jug, 10.5 mm (4 1/8"), free-blow, yellow-green glass, conical piriform body, tubular neck, slight funnel mouth, washer-like sprinkler diaphragm constriction at the base of neck, handle attached below rim and below neck, kicked bottom with pontil mark; from a Florida dealer; $400.00 (352.00)


Roman, Syro-Palestinian, Glass Fusiform Unguentarium with Iridescence, c. 3rd - 5th Century A.D.

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Hayes' Ontario Museum catalog references many similar specimens, noting some are from Beirut. Our example is finer than most examples of similar form, many of which appear to be carelessly made. Hayes' dates the type 5th century or later. Perhaps the finer form indicates ours is earlier.
AG63806. cf. Ontario Museum 461, Choice. complete and intact, much iridescence, fusiform unguentarium, 16.5 cm, spindle-shaped long tubular body, upper half is a neck narrowing slightly to folded and flattened rim, small shoulder at center, lower half is a narrow tubular body narrowing to a rounded point, stand not included; from a Florida dealer; $370.00 (325.60)




  







Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 20, 2019.
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Antiquities