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Syracuse, Sicily, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.

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SH86312. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series XIVb, 489 (V258/R351); SNG ANS 156 (same dies); Weber 1583 (same obv. die); BMC Sicily, p. 156, 80; Jameson 762; HGC 2 1312, EF, mint luster in recesses, light tone, obverse die wear, uneven strike, reverse off center, weight 17.391 g, maximum diameter 27.5 mm, die axis 180o, Syracuse mint, 466 - 460 B.C.; obverse charioteer driving slow quadriga right, holding reins in both hands, goad in right hand, Nike above flying left crowning driver with wreath, Ketos (sea serpent) right in exergue; reverse ΣYPAKOΣON, head of Arethusa right, wearing pearl or bead necklace and earring with loop and finial pendant, thin band wound once around her head and tying back hair in queue, four dolphins around swimming clockwise; ex CNG auction 102 (18 May 2016), lot 135; ex Colin E. Pitchfork Collection; ex Dr. Neil Geddes (20 Nov 2002); ex Noble auction 54 (22 July 1997), lot 1640; ex Stack’s sale, 6 Dec 1995, lot 65; $1900.00 (€1672.00)


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

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These coins are usually overstruck on earlier denarii or drachms.
JD91425. Silver zuz, Mildenberg 174 (O22/R109); BMC Palestine, p. 299, 79; SNG ANS 561; Hendin 1435; Meshorer TJC 274, Choice EF, broad flan, flow lines, tiny edge cracks, die wear, weight 3.362 g, maximum diameter 19.6 mm, die axis 225o, Judaean mint, undated issue of year 3, 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew legend: Shim'on, bunch of grapes in three lobes hanging from branch, which has a tendril to the left and a leaf to the right; reverse Paleo-Hebrew legend: for the freedom of Jerusalem, kithara with three strings; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $1500.00 (€1320.00)


Syracuse, Sicily, Second Democracy, 466 - 405 B.C.

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Following Heron's death, democracy was restored in 466 B.C. Similar to at Athens, the polis was governed by a council and popular assembly with an executive consisting of elected generals or strategoi. Syracuse fought against Athens 427 - 424 B.C. and again 415 - 413 B.C.; ultimately Syracuse was victorious. With further reforms by Diocles, the democratic nature of Syracuse's political structure was further strengthened.
SH89722. Silver tetradrachm, Boehringer Series XX, 698 (V344/R476); SNG ANS 233 (same dies); BMC Sicily p. 161, 115 (same); Weber 1592 (same); HGC 2 1322 (S), VF, elegant nymph well centered on a tight flan, obverse strike weak and crowded by tight flan, weight 16.854 g, maximum diameter 24.4 mm, die axis 270o, Syracuse mint, c. 425 - 420 B.C.; obverse male charioteer driving a walking quadriga to right, wearing a long chiton, goad in his right hand, reins in both hands, Nike above flying left to crown the charioteer; reverse ΣYPAKOΣION upward on right, Head of Arethusa right, her hair in a sakkos and an ampyx, bound with olive-wreath and a double decorated fillet, wearing earring and a necklace with a lion's head, four dolphins swimming around; scarce; $1260.00 (€1108.80)


Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

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Justin was unable to hold the territory Justinian had restored. Most of Italy and parts of Spain were quickly lost to the Lombards and Visigoths. Refusal to pay tribute to the Sassanids, resulted in protracted war. The burdens of office drove him insane and his successor was regent for the last four years of his reign.
SH91674. Gold solidus, DOC I 5d, Wroth BMC 11, Tolstoi 10, Hahn MIB II 1, Sommer 5.3, SBCV 346, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Choice EF, mint luster, well centered, broad flan, flan flaw obv. 12:00, weight 4.490 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 567 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, helmet with crest, trefoil ornament and pendilia, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, shield ornamented with horseman in left hand; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG H (victory of the three emperors, 8th officina), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, wearing crested helmet, aegis on right shoulder, spear in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand, star left, CONOB in exergue; ex Maxwell Hunt Collection; very scarce; $800.00 (€704.00)


Greco-Roman Anatatolia (Smyrna, Ionia?), Terracotta Woman Holding Infant, 2nd century B.C. - 1st century A.D.

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Kourotrophos (Greek: "child nurturer") was an Athenian deity, the protector of children and young people, with a cult and sanctuary, the so-called Kourotropheion. Gods and goddesses, including Athena, Apollo, Hermes, Hecate, Aphrodite, and Artemis, are given the epithet Kourotrophos when depicted holding an infant. Figurines of females holding infants are also called Kourotrophos. The purpose of kourotrophic figurines is debated. Perhaps they are representations of the Athenian goddess. Perhaps they were fertility or childbirth charms. They are found in graves, so perhaps they were companions for the dead.

We were unable to find another example of this type. Attribution to Smyrna, Ionia is based on the color and texture of the clay, and on the style and workmanship.
AH21487. Terracotta kourotrophos statuette of a woman holding a swaddled infant, 25cm (9 7/8") tall, mold-made, hollow and without back, Choice, complete and intact, old dealer labels on the reverse, stands on its own base, Late Hellenistic to Roman Era; $600.00 (€528.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D., Neapolis, Samaria

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Neapolis, Samaria, the biblical Shechemis, is now Nablus, Israel, the site of Joseph's Tomb and Jacob's well. Jesus spoke here to a Samaritan woman. The city was refounded as Flavia Neopolis in Syria Palestina after the Jewish Revolt. These coin types were used by archaeologists in the 1950's and 60's to locate the remains of the temple complex by comparing the profile of the mountain to the surrounding terrain.
JD93014. Bronze AE 29, cf. BMC Palestine p. 63, 116; Harl Neapolis - (obv. die A6); Sofaer pl. 57, 180 (this rev. die, Otacilia Severa obv.); Rosenberger -; SNG ANS -, VF, broad flan, porous, obverse slightly off center, weight 16.081 g, maximum diameter 28.9 mm, die axis 180o, Neapolis (Nablus, Israel) mint, Feb 244 - End Sep 249 A.D.; obverse IMP C M IVL PHILIPPO P F AVG, laureate and draped bust right, seen from behind; reverse COL SER-G NEAPOL, Mount Gerizim surmounted by a temple and altar, stairway to temple from colonnade below mountain; all supported by an eagle standing slightly right, wings open; no sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives; from the Jimi Berlin Caesarea Collection (surface find, 1976, Caesarea, Israel); extremely rare; $500.00 (€440.00)


Thasos, Thrace, c. 500 - 480 B.C.

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Nymphs are nature spirits who appear as beautiful, young nubile maidens. They dwell in mountains, valleys and groves, by springs and rivers, and also in trees and cool grottoes. Nymphs love to dance and sing and are the frequent target of satyrs. Satyrs are male companions of Pan and Dionysus with goat-like features, including a goat-tail, goat-like ears, and sometimes a goat-like phallus. As Dionysiac creatures, Satyrs are lovers of wine and women and ready for every physical pleasure. They are obsessed with nymphs.
SH91802. Silver stater, Le Rider Thasiennes 2; SNG Cop 1008; BMC Thrace p. 216, 2; McClean 4195; Svoronos HPM pl. X, 7; Dewing 1312; HGC 6 331, Choice F, very well centered, toned, typical flat strike, scratches, weight 9.155 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, Thasos mint, c. 500 - 480 B.C.; obverse nude ithyphallic satyr kneeling-running right, carrying in his arms a struggling nymph, raising her right hand in protest, both with long strait hair indicated with dots, she wears a long chiton, her arm fingers and thumb forming a Y shape; reverse quadripartite incuse square; $480.00 (€422.40)


Judaea, Bar Kochba Revolt, 132 - 135 A.D.

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In 134, the Romans captured Jerusalem. Simon bar Kokhba was killed in 135, at Betar, a fortress where he had taken refuge. Jerusalem, largely destroyed, was renamed Colonia Aelia Capitolina. Legio VI Ferrata rebuilt the legionary fortress in the city and constructed a Roman temple at Golgotha. An altar to Jupiter was erected on the site of the Temple in Jerusalem. Although, resistance continued in Galilee, the Jewish diaspora began as Emperor Hadrian barred Jews from Jerusalem and had survivors of the massacre dispersed across the Roman Empire. Many were sold into slavery. The Jews remained scattered without a homeland for close to two millennia.
JD91403. Bronze AE 20, Mildenberg, group 3b, 33 (O2/R12); Meshorer TJC 297 (same dies); SNG ANS 584 (same dies); Hendin 1436a, VF, toned, light earthen deposits, flan adjustment marks, tiny edge cracks, tight flan, weight 6.625 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, undated (year 3?), 134 - 135 A.D.; obverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription counterclockwise from lower right: for the freedom of Jerusalem, upright palm branch within laurel wreath, wreath with four groups of three leaves on each side, a medallion at the top and ribbon ties at the bottom; reverse Paleo-Hebrew inscription counterclockwise from lower right: Shimon, kithara-lyre with a long soundbox and three strings, no horn-like projections on lyre (present on most dies); from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Fairlane Collection; $450.00 (€396.00)


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Louis of Burgundy, 31 Jul 1313 - 2 Aug 1316

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Louis of Burgundy was a younger son of Robert II, Duke of Burgundy and Agnes of France. On 31 Jul 1313, he married Matilda of Hainaut to whom Philip I of Taranto gave the Principality of Achaea. Louis ceded his family lands in Burgundy to his elder brother in exchange for the title of "King of Thessalonica." Matilda and Louis arrived separately in Achaea, she sailing directly from Marseille to Navarino with 1,000 troops. Matilda's army was defeated on 22 Feb 1316 by Ferdinand of Majorca, who also claimed the principality. Louis came by way of Venice to solicit aid from the Republic. He defeated Ferdinand, who was killed in the battle, on 5 July 1316. Four weeks later, Louis died. The Chronicle of the Morea attributes his death to a fever, while the Catalan Declaratio summa states that he was poisoned by John, count of Cephalonia. His death left Achaea in an unsettled state, with his brother Eudes, his wife, and the Angevins all attempting to gain it.Arms_of_Achaea
CR88490. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 29; Metcalf Crusades pl. 40, 993; Schlumberger XII 23, aVF, excellent centering, coppery spots, strike a little soft, tiny edge chip, weight 0.640 g, maximum diameter 19.2 mm, die axis 135o, Clarentza mint, 5 Jul - 2 Aug 1316; obverse + LODOVIC'•D'•B'•P•AChE, cross pattée; reverse (annulet) DE CLARENCIA (annulet), castle tournois, surmounted by cross, annulet left of castle; from the Louis G Estate; very rare; $400.00 (€352.00)


Crusaders, Frankish Greece, Principality of Achaea, Ferdinand of Majorca, Pretender, Jun 1315 - 5 July 1316

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Ferdinand of Majorca, as the third son of King James II, was an infante (prince) of the Kingdom of Majorca. It is this title on the obverse of this coin. He was also Viscount of Aumelas and Lord of Frontignan. Ferdinand married Isabella, daughter of Margaret of Villehardouin and they had a son who held the claim on the Principality of Achaea. Margaret and then his wife died in 1315, and soon after he set out with a small company for the Morea to uphold the claim now held by his son. He seized Clarenza in June 1315 and briefly took control of the Morea. In the autumn of 1315 he took a second wife, Isabella of Ibelin. However, his rival claimant Matilda of Hainaut, and her husband Louis of Burgundy returned to the Morea in the spring of 1316 with Venetian aid. Ferdinand's expected aid from Majorca and Sicily was tardy, as was the Catalan Company from Athens. Facing superior numbers, he was killed at the Battle of Manolada on 5 July 1316.Frankokratia_Map
CR88491. Billon denier tournois, Malloy Crusaders 31a, Metcalf Crusades 987 - 992, VF, well centered, clashed dies, weak strike, part of edge ragged, weight 0.684 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 270o, Clarentza mint, pretender, Jun 1315 - 5 July 1316; obverse +IFANSFD'MAIORK, cross pattée; reverse (annulet) DE CLARENCIA (annulet), castle tournois, surmounted by cross, surmounted by cross, annulet left and right of the castle; from the Louis G Estate; extremely rare; $400.00 (€352.00)




  







Catalog current as of Sunday, December 15, 2019.
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