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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Lion||View Options:  |  |  |   

Lions on Ancient Coins

Lydian Kingdom, Alyattes Kroisos, c. 620 - 539 B.C.

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The knob on the lion's snout is also described as a "wart," and as the radiant Sun.
SH91787. Electrum trite, Weidauer group XVI, 86; SNGvA 2868; SNG Cop 449; SNG Lockett 2977; SNG Ash 749; Rosen 655; Boston MFA 1764; BMC Lydia 2, 7, pl. I, 6, aVF, banker's marks, weight 4.665 g, maximum diameter 12.5 mm, Sardes (Sart, Turkey) mint, c. 620/610-550/539 B.C.; obverse head of roaring lion right, with knob and rays atop snout; reverse irregular divided rectangular incuse; $2300.00 (2024.00)


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator as Satrap, 311 - 305 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91518. Silver stater, Houghton-Lorber 88.2a; Newell ESM 263; BMC Arabia p. 188, 43; Traite II, p. 487, 774; Weber 8202; HGC 9 67a , Choice F, well centered, old cabinet toning, light marks areas of light etching, tiny edge split, weight 13.518 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon II (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 311 - 303 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on seat; reverse lion standing left, anchor (control symbol) above, nothing in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Hesperia Art; scarce; $780.00 SALE |PRICE| $700.00 ON RESERVE


Chersonesos, Thrace, c. 386 - 338 B.C.

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Chersonesos is Greek for 'peninsula' and several cities used the name. The city in Thracian Chersonesos (the Gallipoli peninsula) that struck these coins is uncertain. The coins may have been struck at Cardia by the peninsula as a league, or perhaps they were struck by lost city on the peninsula named Chersonesos. Chersonesos was controlled by Athens from 560 B.C. to 338 B.C., aside from a brief period during this time when it was controlled by Persia. It was taken by Philip II of Macedonia in 338 B.C., Pergamon in 189 B.C., and Rome in 133 B.C. It was later ruled by the Byzantine Empire and then by the Ottoman Turks.
GS89040. Silver hemidrachm, McClean II 4120; Weber 2432; BMC Thrace p. 186, 50; HGC 3 1437; SNG Cop -, Choice gVF, fine style, well centered, tiny edge cut, weight 2.370 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, die axis 270o, Chersonesos (Sevastopol, Ukraine) mint, c. 386 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet above X in one sunken quarter, kerykeion in the opposite sunken quarter; ex CNG e-auction 249 (9 Feb 2011), lot 34 (realized $320 plus fees); $350.00 (308.00)


Persian Empire, Mazaeus, Satrap of Cilicia, c. 361 - 334 B.C., Tarsos, Cilicia

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Mazaeus was a Persian noble and satrap of Cilicia and later satrap of Babylon for the Achaemenid Empire, a satrapy which he retained under Alexander the Great. The daughter of the Persian king Darius III, Stateira II, was originally betrothed to him, but he died before they could be married. She was eventually married to Alexander.
GS89703. Silver obol, Casabonne series 5, group C; SNG Levante 191 (Myriandros); SNG BnF 435 (Myriandros); Gktrk -, VF, light toning, light marks and some porosity, tight flan, weight 0.896 g, maximum diameter 11.5 mm, die axis 180o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 361 - 334 B.C.; obverse Baaltars seated left on throne without back, lotus-tipped scepter in right hand, shoulders and chest bare, chlamys around hips and legs and over left arm, right leg forward; reverse lion advancing right, star above, large crescent below; ex Beast Coins; rare; $280.00 (246.40) ON RESERVE


Gallic Celts, Carnutes, Beauce Area, c. 41 - 30 B.C.

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The helmeted bust on the obverse is derived from that of Minerva on the Roman Republic denarius of C. Vibius Varus, 42 B.C. (Crawford 494/38, Sydenham 1140).
CE89589. Bronze piastre, CCBM III 119, De la Tour 7105, Delestre-Tache 2473, Scheers S-M 324 ff., Blanchet 274, aVF, green patina with darker fields, some bumps and scratches, light corrosion, weight 2.923 g, maximum diameter 16.2 mm, die axis 270o, c. 41 - 30 B.C.; obverse PIXTILOS, helmeted head left, the neck adorned with a torque, branch left, ornaments above; reverse PIXTILOS, lion running left, tail curled above the back, two ringed pellets above, stylized bird right below; ex CGB Numismatique Paris; scarce; $260.00 (228.80)


Miletos, Ionia, c. 340 - 325 B.C.

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Didyma, on the coast of Ionia, was the largest and most significant sanctuary in the territory of the great classical city Miletus. It contained a temple and oracle of Apollo, the Didymaion. Next to Delphi, Didyma was the most renowned oracle of the Hellenic world, first mentioned among the Greeks in the Homeric Hymn to Apollo, but an establishment preceding literacy and even the Hellenic colonization of Ionia. The 6th century Didymaion, enclosed its smaller predecessor. Its treasury was enriched by gifts from Croesus. To approach it, visitors would follow the Sacred Way to Didyma, about 17 km long. Along the way, were ritual way stations, and statues of members of the Branchidae family, male and female, as well as animal figures. Some of these statues, dating to the 6th century B.C. are now in the British Museum, taken by Charles Newton in the 19th century. The ruins of Didyma are located at a short distance to the northwest of modern Didim in Aydin Province, Turkey.The Didymaion
GS89071. Silver drachm, cf. Marcellesi 3; SNG Cop 957 ff.; BMC Ionia p. 189, 53 ff., gVF, toned, some roughness, weight 3.421 g, maximum diameter 14.4 mm, die axis 0o, Miletos (near Balat, Turkey) mint, c. 340 - 325 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Apollo left; reverse lion standing left, head turned back right, star above, MI monogram before, magistrates name in exergue (off flan); ex CNG e-auction 231 (14 Apr 2010), lot 96; $250.00 (220.00)


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91080. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, crude style, porous, edge crack, weight 2.161 g, maximum diameter 13.81 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; rare; $250.00 (220.00)


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

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This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91082. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4056; BMC Thrace p. 183, 8; Dewing 1301; SNG Cop 824; Weber II - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, extremely crude lion, light marks, weight 2.040 g, maximum diameter 13.4 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left, tongue protruding; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet at the center of each of the two opposite deeper quarters; $250.00 (220.00)


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91084. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, lightly etched surface, obverse off center, weight 2.470 g, maximum diameter 13.6 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (220.00)


Thracian Tribes, c. 400 - 338 B.C., Imitative of Chersonesos

Click for a larger photo
This "barbarous imitation" was likely minted by a Thracian tribe living near the Greek colony of Cherronesos. Imitative tribal coinage such as this was common in the outlying regions of the classical world as peoples who traded with the ancient Greeks and Romans, also emulated their ways. The coin's simplified style is typical of such coinage. Tribal coinage has not been as well studied or documented and apparently no Cherronesos imitatives are listed in the references held by Forum.
GS91085. Silver hemidrachm, cf. McClean II 4079; BMC Thrace p. 183, 11; SNG Ashmolean 3589; Weber 2419; SNG Cop - (Chersonesos prototype), VF, uneven obverse strike, porous etched surfaces, weight 2.374 g, maximum diameter 13.2 mm, tribal mint, c. 400 - 338 B.C.; obverse lion forepart right, head turned back left; reverse quadripartite incuse square with alternating shallow and deeper sunken quarters, pellet in one sunken quarter, bunch of grapes in the opposite sunken quarter; $250.00 (220.00)




  



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