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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Animals| ▸ |Stag or Doe||View Options:  |  |  | 

Stags or Deer on Ancient Coins

Magnesia ad Meandrum, Ionia, c. 145 - 70 B.C.

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Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
GB91731. Bronze AE 21, SNGvA 2041, SNG Mnchen 602, SNG Fitzwilliam 4514, Lindgren III 371, SNG Cop -, Choice VF, dark patina with highlighting earthen deposits, weight 12.257 g, maximum diameter 20.5 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 145 - 70 B.C.; obverse head of Artemis right, bow and quiver behind shoulder; reverse stag standing right on meander pattern, head down, MAΓNHTΩN above, ΠAYΣANIAΣ / MHTPO∆ΩPOΣ (Pausanias, son of Metrodoros [magistrate]) in two lines in the exergue; only three sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; very rare; $250.00 (220.00)


Philip I the Arab, February 244 - End of September 249 A.D.

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During Philip's reign the 1000th anniversary of Rome (248 A.D.) was celebrated, and magnificent games were held. This coin was issued as part of that celebration and the reverse undoubted depicts one of the animal types displayed and hunted in the Colosseum during the games.
RB87835. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC IV 160a; Cohen V 183, Hunter III 107, SRCV III 9012, VF, nice portrait, well centered, some bumps and scratches, a little rough and porous, edge cracks, traces of shellac(?), weight 16.917 g, maximum diameter 28.6 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 248 A.D.; obverse IMP M IVL PHILIPPVS AVG, laureate, draped (and cuirassed?) bust right, from behind; reverse SAECVLARES AVGG (Secular games [provided by] the Emperors), stag standing right, S C (senatus consulto) in exergue; $180.00 (158.40)


Kition, Cyprus, Melekiathon, c. 392 - 361 B.C.

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Kition also known by its Latin name Citium, was a city-kingdom on the southern coast of Cyprus (in present-day Larnaca). It was established in the 13th century B.C. Its most famous, and probably only known, resident was Zeno of Citium, born c. 334 B.C. in Citium and founder of the Stoic school of philosophy which he taught in Athens from about 300 B.C.
GS92809. Silver 1/3 stater, Tziambazis 30; Babelon Perses 707; BMC Cyprus p. xxvi, (i), pl. XIX, 7; Zapiti-Michaelidou -, aVF, struck with worn dies, weight 3.669 g, maximum diameter 13.9 mm, die axis 0o, Kition mint, c. 392 - 361 B.C.; obverse Melqart-Herakles in fighting stance right, lion skin on arm, club overhead in right hand, bow extended before him in left hand; reverse lion attacking stag crouching right, MLK-ML[...] (in Aramaic) above, all in dotted square border; ex CNG e-auction 413 (31 Jan 2018), lot 120; rare ruler; $165.00 (145.20)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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The "zoo series" of coins calling on Diana to protect the Emperor was struck late in Gallienus' reign. His father, Valerian, had been particularly dedicated to the worship of Diana the Preserver and had dedicated a temple to her at Rome. Diana apparently did not favor Gallienus. Not long after this coin was struck, he was assassinated near Milan while attempting to deal with the usurper Aureolus.
RB91182. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 728z, RIC V-1 S176, RSC IV 153, SRCV III 10199, EF, traces of silvering, tight flan, weight 2.712 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 267 - Sep 268 A.D.; obverse IMP GALLIENVS AVG, radiate head right; reverse DIANAE CONS AVG (to Diana protector of the Emperor), doe walking right with head turned back left, E in exergue; $140.00 (123.20)


Magnesia ad Maeander, Ionia, c. 190 - 30 B.C.

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Magnesia ad Maeandrum was an inland city of Ionia, located on a small tributary of the Maeander River about 12 miles southeast of Ephesus. "..the temple of Artemis Leukophryene, which in the size of its shrine and in the number of its votive offerings is inferior to the temple at Ephesos, but in the harmony and skill shown in the structure of the sacred enclosure is far superior to it. And in size it surpasses all the sacred enclosures in Asia except two, that at Ephesos (to Artemis) and that at Didymoi (to Apollo)" -- Strabo, Geography 14. 1. 40.
GB89370. Bronze AE 17, SNG Cop 853; SNG Tbingen 2958; BMC Ionia p. 164, 47, aVF, green patina, scratches, light earthen deposits, weight 5.575 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, c. 190 - 30 B.C.; obverse stag standing right, star above left, MAΓNHT below; reverse cult statue of Artemis Leukophryene facing, KPATINOΣ (magistrate Kratinos) downward on left, EYKΛHΣ (magistrate Eukles) downward on right; rare; $100.00 (88.00)


Ephesos, Ionia, c. 390 - 320 B.C.

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In 356 B.C. the temple of Artemis was burned down, according to legend, by a lunatic called Herostratus. Ephesus planned a larger, grander temple and at once started rebuilding. When Alexander the Great defeated the Persian forces at the Battle of Granicus in 334 B.C., the Greek cities of Anatolia were liberated. The pro-Persian tyrant Syrpax and his family were stoned to death, and Alexander was greeted warmly when he entered Ephesus in triumph. When Alexander saw that the temple of Artemis was not yet finished, he proposed to finance it and have his name inscribed on the front. But the Ephesians demurred, saying it was not fitting for one god to build a temple to another.
GS92930. Silver diobol, SNG Kayhan 194; SNG Cop 243; SNGvA 1835; SNG Mnchen 32; BMC Ionia p. 53, 53; SGCV II 4375, gF, dark toning, obverse a little off center, minor lamination defects, weight 0.938 g, maximum diameter 10.1 mm, die axis 0o, Ephesos mint, c. 390 - 320 B.C.; obverse bee with straight wings, seen from above; reverse confronted heads of two stags, EΦ above; $100.00 (88.00)


Hierocaesarea, Lydia, c. 100 - 150 A.D.

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Hierocaesarea from the Greek for 'sacred' and the Latin for 'Caesar's', also known as Hieracome or Hierakome, was a town and bishopric in the late Roman province of Lydia, the metropolitan see of which was Sardis. Judging from its coins, it worshiped the goddess Artemis Persica.
RP92869. Bronze AE 17, Imhoof-Blumer LS 23; RPC III Online 1854; BMC Lydia p. 103, 6; SNG Cop 176; Waddington 5001; SNGvA -; Weber -, VF, nice green patina, obverse off center, broad flan, weight 3.163 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 0o, Hierocaesarea (near Sazoba, Turkey) mint, c. 100 - 150 A.D.; obverse ΠEPCIKH, bust of Artemis Persica right, bow and quiver at shoulder; reverse IEPOKAICA-PE-ΩN (the last two letters in exergue), stag walking right; scarce; $90.00 (79.20)


Gordian III, 29 July 238 - 25 February 244 A.D., Hadrianopolis, Thrace

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When Artemis was a child, she found five gigantic hinds (female deer) grazing in Thessaly and captured four of them to draw her chariot. The fifth escaped across a river to Mt. Cerynaea, on the border of Achaea and Arcadia. The Ceryneian or Golden Hind was sacred to Artemis. Although female, it had golden antlers like a stag and hooves of bronze. It was said that it could outrun an arrow in flight. Artemis allowed Heracles to capture the hind, his third labor, after he promised to liberate the animal after completing his task.
RP92882. Bronze tetrassarion, Jurukova 477 (V231/R463); CN Online Hadrianopolis CN_7052; Varbanov II 3724 (R4); BMC Thrace p. 120, 30; SNG Hunter -; SNG Cop -; Lindgren -, F, green patina, centered on a tight flan, central depressions, weight 10.412 g, maximum diameter 25.6 mm, die axis 180o, Hadrianopolis (Edirne, Turkey) mint, c. 238 - 244 A.D.; obverse AVT K M ANT GOR∆IANOC AVΓ (VΓ ligate), laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse A∆PIANOΠOΛEITΩN, Artemis standing facing, head left, wearing short chiton and boots, holding patera in outstretched right hand, bow in left hand, stag at her feet standing left; $90.00 (79.20)


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Hierapolis, Phrygia in Homonoia with Ephesus

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This coin commemorates the homonoia (alliance) between Phrygia and Ephesus. Cities in Thrace and Asia minor sometimes formed alliances with other cities. The competition for prestige and rivalry between cities in the East was intense. Alliances could enhance a citys status by aligning either with many cities or with particularly important ones. Homonoia was part of civic "foreign policy" and might have involved the exchange of delegates and joint celebrations and sacrifices. At least 87 cities issued homonoia coins celebrating their alliances.
RP77245. Bronze AE 32, Franke-Nolle, type VII, 743 (Vs. B/ Rs. 39); cf. BMC Phrygia p. 264, 188; SNG Hunterian 1957; SNG Righetti 1189, aVF, slightly ragged flan, potentially active corrosion, weight 10.522 g, maximum diameter 31.6 mm, die axis 180o, Phrygia, Hierapolis (near Pamukkale, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AV KE - ΠOV ΛIK OYA/ΛEPIANOC, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, wearing aegis from which two snakes rise; reverse IEPAΠOΛEI/TΩN - K EΦECIΩN, Serapis standing right, kalathos on head holding transverse scepter; to right, Artemis Ephesia facing, resting each hand on the head of a stag, one stag flanking on each side, NEΩ/KO/PΩ/N in four lines in center field, OMONOIA in exergue; very rare; $60.00 (52.80)







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Catalog current as of Thursday, December 12, 2019.
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