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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Good Luck||View Options:  |  |  |   

Luck (Forutuna)

The Romans believed that Fortuna after deserting the Persians and Assyrians took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. Fortuna distributed good and evil among mankind according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning."


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS92309. Silver denarius, RIC IV 369; RSC III 68; BMCRE V p. 91, 343; SRCV II 6267; Hunter III 176 var. (IMP CE L..), Choice gVF, well centered and struck, toned, edge cracks, weight 3.208 g, maximum diameter 18.3 mm, die axis 0o, Emesa (Homs, Syria) mint, 194 A.D.; obverse IMP CAE L SEP SEV PERT AVG COS II, laureate head right; reverse BONI EVENTVS, Bonus Eventus standing slightly left, head left, raising a shallow basket of fruit in right hand, two heads of grain downward in left; $160.00 (140.80)


Roman Republic, Quintus Cassius Longinus, 55 B.C.

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The obverse portrait has been variously interpreted as Bonus Eventus (the God of good Success) or Genius Populi Romani (the guardian spirit of the Roman people). Quintus Cassius Longinus was a governor in Hispania for Caesar. Cassius was one of the tresviri monetales of the Roman mint in 55 B.C. He served as a quaestor for Pompey in Hispania Ulterior in 54 B.C.
RR87659. Silver denarius, Crawford 428/3, Sydenham 916, RSC I Cassia 7, BMCRR I Rome 3868, RBW Collection 1535, SRCV I 391, aVF, light toning, highest points flatly struck, banker's marks, bumps and scratches, scrape on reverse, closed edge crack, weight 3.651 g, maximum diameter 18.9 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 55 B.C.; obverse young male head (Genius Populi Romani or Bonus Eventus) right, scepter behind; reverse eagle standing right on thunderbolt, head right, wings open, lituus (augur's staff) on left, jug on right, QCASSIVS below; $140.00 (123.20)


Trajan, 25 January 98 - 8 or 9 August 117 A.D.

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Bonus Eventus, the god of good outcomes, was originally worshiped by the Romans as a deity especially presiding over agriculture and successful harvests. During the Imperial era, he was associated with other types of success. The epithet Bonus, "the Good," is used with other abstract deities such as Bona Fortuna ("Good Fortune"), Bona Mens ("Good Thinking" or "Sound Mind"), and Bona Spes ("Good Hope," perhaps to be translated as "optimism"), as well as with the mysterious and multivalent Bona Dea, a goddess whose rites were celebrated by women.
RS88847. Silver denarius, Woytek 421v, BMCRE III 429, BnF IV 739, RSC II 398, RIC II 275, Strack I 184, Hunter II -, aVF, nice portrait, well centered, toned, tight flan, weight 3.269 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 195o, Rome mint, end 113 - 114 A.D.; obverse IMP TRAIANO AVG GERM DAC P M TR P COS VI P P, laureate draped bust right; reverse S P Q R OPTIMO PRINCIPI, Bonus Eventus standing slightly left, head left, nude, patera extended in right hand, heads of grain pointed down in left hand at side; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 72, part of lot 1047; $130.00 (114.40)


Hadrian, 11 August 117 - 10 July 138 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever.
RB88866. Orichalcum sestertius, RIC II 759(d), BMCRE III 1507, Hunter II 533, Cohen II 763, SRCV II 3599, aF, toned brass surfaces, some porosity, edge bump, weight 24.815 g, maximum diameter 30.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 134 - 138 A.D.; obverse HADRIANVS AVG COS III P P, laureate head right; reverse FORTVNA AVG (good fortune of the Emperor), Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S - C (senatus consulto) across field; $120.00 (105.60)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D.

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The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Egypt and into Syria. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel, entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. It appears, however, she kept her wheel. She just hid it under her seat.
RS89488. Silver denarius, RIC IV 189b; RSC III 461; BMCRE V p. 240, 432; Hunter 49; SRCV II 6334, VF, nice portrait, well centered, light tone, edge cracks, weight 2.912 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, 203 A.D.; obverse SEVERVS PIVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse P M TR P XI COS III P P, Fortuna seated left, feet on low stool, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, scepter in left hand, wheel under seat; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 73, part of lot 970; $110.00 (96.80)


Aurelian, August or September 270 - October or November 275 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RA91227. Billon antoninianus, SRCV III 11539, Cohen VI 82, Hunter IV - (p. cx), VF, desert patina, oval flan, small edge split, weight 3.330 g, maximum diameter 22.6 mm, die axis 0o, Milan(?) mint, c. 270 - 271 A.D.; obverse IMP AVRELIANVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna seated left on wheel, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, exergue off flan; ex Numismatik Naumann auction 76 (7 April 2019), part of lot 942; $95.00 (83.60)


Julia Domna, Augusta 194 - 8 April 217 A.D.

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Felicitas was the goddess or personification of happiness, good fortune, and success. She played an important role in Rome's state religion during the empire and was frequently portrayed on coins. She became a prominent symbol of the wealth and prosperity of the Roman Empire.
RS92479. Silver denarius, RIC IV S551; RSC III 47; BMCRE V p. 160, S22; SRCV II 6581; Hunter III S24, Choice VF/F, nice portrait, well centered, toned, flow lines, light marks and scratches, small edge splits, weight 3.250 g, maximum diameter 19.8 mm, die axis 0o, Rome mint, c. 206 A.D.; obverse IVLIA AVGVSTA, draped bare-headed bust right, hair in horizontal ridges, flat coil at back of head; reverse FELICITAS, Felicitas standing left, caduceus in right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand; from the Errett Bishop Collection; $90.00 (79.20)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Fortuna (equivalent to the Greek goddess Tyche) goddess of fortune, was the personification of luck. Fortuna Redux brought one safely home, in this case the emperor. The Romans believed that Fortuna, after deserting the Persians and Assyrians, took flight over Macedonia and saw Alexander perish as she passed into Syria and Egypt. At last arriving on Mount Palatine, she threw aside her wings and casting away her wheel (the wheel of fortune), entered Rome where she took up her abode forever. It appears, however, she kept her wheel. She just hid it under her seat.
RA89644. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 546g, RSC IV 279 (Mediolanum), RIC V-1 S484 (Mediolanum), SRCV III -, Hunter IV - (p. lxi), Choice aVF, near full silvering, full legends, centers a little weak, flan shape slightly irregular, weight 2.792 g, maximum diameter 23.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Rome mint, c. 262 - 263 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate bust right, drapery on left shoulder; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna seated left, holding rudder on globe by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, S in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 (52.80)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D.

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Fortuna Redux, one of the many aspects of Fortuna, was in charge of bringing people home safely, primarily from wars - redux means "coming back" or "returning." She may be one of the later aspects of Fortuna, as the earliest mention of her is on an altar dedicated by the Senate in 19 B.C. for the safe return of Emperor Augustus.
RA89646. Billon antoninianus, Gbl MIR 1640b, RSC IV 277, RIC V-1 S613, Hunter IV 203, SRCV III 10220, Choice VF, full borders centering, dark patina, traces of silvering, weight 3.619 g, maximum diameter 22.1 mm, die axis 0o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 266 - 267 A.D.; obverse GALLIENVS AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right; reverse FORTVNA REDVX, Fortuna standing slightly left, head left, caduceus in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, VII C (= COS VII) in exergue; ex Beast Coins, ex Dan Hoffman Gallienus Collection; $60.00 (52.80)


Probus, Summer 276 - September 282 A.D.

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In 280, Proculus, a Roman usurper, started a rebellion at Lugdunum (Lyon, France) and proclaimed himself emperor. Probus suppressed the revolt and Proculus was executed.
RA47769. Silvered antoninianus, RIC V-2 104, Bastien IX 269, aMS, full silvering, excellent centering, weight 3.473 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, obverse IMP C PROBVS P F AVG, radiate and cuirassed bust right, slight drapery on far shoulder; reverse TEMPOR FELICI (time of good fortune), Felicitas standing right, long caduceus in right hand, cornucopia inwardly in left hand, I in exergue; $45.00 (39.60)




  



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Catalog current as of Tuesday, October 15, 2019.
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Luck