Coins and Antiquities Consignment Shop
  Welcome Guest. Please login or register. All items are guaranteed authentic for eternity! Please call us if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business! Welcome Guest. Please login or register. Internet challenged? We are happy to take your order over the phone. Please call if you have questions 252-646-1958. Thanks for your business!

×Catalog Main Menu
Fine Coins Showcase

Antiquities Showcase
Recent Additions
Recent Price Reductions

Show empty categories
Shop Search
Shopping Cart
Contact Us
About Forum
Shopping at Forum
Our Guarantee
Payment Options
Shipping Options & Fees
Privacy & Security
Forum Staff
Selling Your Coins
Identifying Your Coin
FAQs
   View Categories
Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Tyche||View Options:  |  |  |   

Tyche

Tyche (Greek for luck; the Roman equivalent was Fortuna) was the guardian deity that governed the fortune and prosperity of a city, its destiny. She is usually depicted veiled and wearing a mural crown (a crown like the walls of the city). The blind mistress of Fortune, Tyche was arbitrary and unreliable, distributing good and evil according to her caprice and without any regard to merit. The Greek historian Polybius believed that when no cause can be discovered for events such as floods, drought or frosts then the cause of these events could be fairly attributed to Tyche.


Plotina, Augusta 105 - 129 A.D., Amphipolis, Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
Plotina was the wife of Trajan, married to him before his succession. She was renowned for her virtue and simplicity. In 100, Trajan awarded her with the title of Augusta, but she did not accept the title until 105. Plotina did not appear on the coinage until 112. She was largely responsible for Hadrian's succession to the throne after the death of Trajan. Plotina died in 129 A.D.
SH79967. Bronze AE 24, RPC Online III 645, SNG Evelpidis 1170, Lindgren 980, SNG ANS -, SNG Cop -, BMC Macedonia -, Varbanov -, F, green patina, pitting, weight 9.487 g, maximum diameter 24.1 mm, die axis 180o, Amphipolis mint, 105 - 129 A.D.; obverse CEBACTH ΠΛWTEINA, draped bust right; reverse AMΦIΠOΛTWN, Tyche seated left, patera in right hand; very rare; $360.00 (316.80)


Sidon, Phoenicia, 116 - 117 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Sidon is mentioned by the prophets Isaiah (e.g. Isaiah 23:2,4,12), Jeremiah (Jeremiah 25:22, 27:3, 47:4), Ezekiel (Ezekiel 27:8, 28:21, 32:30) and Joel (Joel 3:4). Jesus visited Sidon (Matthew 15:21, Mark 3:8, Mark 7:24, Luke 6:17). Paul sailed for Rome from Sidon (Acts 27:3,4).
RF89147. Bronze AE 23, RPC Online III 3871; SNG Cop 247; BMC Phoenicia p. 175, 197; Rouvier 1392; Baramki AUB 195, Nice VF, dark tone, tiny encrustations, slightly off center, weight 10.221 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 0o, Sidon (Saida, Lebanon) mint, time of Hadrian, 116 - 117 A.D.; obverse turreted, veiled, and draped bust of Tyche right, apluster behind, star before below chin; reverse ΣI∆ΩNOΣ - IEPAΣ (Holy Sidon), two-wheeled cart of Astarte carrying cult statue, roof supported by four columns, year ZKΣ (227) below; $175.00 (154.00)


Gallienus, August 253 - September 268 A.D., Side, Pamphylia

Click for a larger photo
The great ruins of Side are among the most notable in Asia Minor. They cover a large promontory which a wall and a moat separate from the mainland. There are two agoras: a commercial agora and the "state" agora. The commercial agora is over 8000 square meters, surrounded by columns, with shops, exedras and latrines and washing places. On it inconceivable numbers of slaves must have been traded, for during part of its history Side was a major center for pirates who stationed their fleet here. At its center, there is a round temple, well-restored, that was dedicated to the protective goddess of the city, Tyche. The present construction dates from the 2nd century A.D. and was still in use in Byzantine times.Temple of Tyche
RP88917. Bronze 5 assaria, SNG Pfalz 823; SNG BnF 922; BMC Lycia p. 161, 117; Waddington 3495; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Righetti -; Lindgren -; c/m: Howgego 805 (169 pcs.), VF, broad flan, porous, edge crack (from counter-marking?), weight 13.494 g, maximum diameter 30.0 mm, die axis 180o, Side (near Selimiye, Antalya Province, Turkey) mint, joint reign, Aug 253 - 260 A.D.; obverse AYT KAI ΠO ΛI ΓAΛΛIHNOC CE (AI in error, should be ΛI, but error is normal for this type), laureate bust right, wearing paludamentum and cuirass, eagle right below with wings open; countermark on right: E (5 assaria) in 7.5mm round punch obliterating IA (prior mark of value); reverse CI∆HTΩN NEΩKOPΩ, draped bust of Tyche right, wearing veil and mural crown, pomegranate on branch right (not fully struck) below; scarce; $150.00 (132.00)


Faustina Junior, Augusta 146 - Winter 175/176 A.D., Wife of Marcus Aurelius, Roman Provincial Egypt

Click for a larger photo
Missing from all the references examined, except Emmett, where the type is listed only for year three and is identified as very rare (R5). We did not find another example online.
RX89193. Bronze diobol, Emmett 2324 (R5), Dattari -, Geissen -, BMC Alexandria -, SNG Milan -, Kampmann -, SRCV II -, VF/F, light marks, edge cracks, beveled obverse edge, weight 8.146 g, maximum diameter 24.3 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 162 - 28 Aug 163 A.D.; obverse ΦAVCTINA CEBACTH, draped bust right; reverse Tyche standing facing, holding rudder by tiller in right hand, cornucopia in left hand, L - Γ (year 3) divided across fields; extremely rare; $140.00 (123.20)


Trebonianus Gallus, June or July 251 - July or August 253 A.D., Seleucia on the Calycadnus, Cilicia

Click for a larger photo
Located a few miles from the mouth of the Calycadnus (Gksu) River, Seleucia ad Calycadnum was founded by Seleucus I Nicator in the early 3rd century B.C., one of several cities he named after himself. The location up river was safer against attacks from the sea so Seleucia achieved considerable commercial prosperity as a port for this corner of Cilicia (later named Isauria), and was even a rival of Tarsus. Cilicia thrived as a province of the Romans, and Seleucia became a religious center with a renowned 2nd century Temple of Jupiter. It was also the site of a noted school of philosophy and literature, the birthplace of peripatetics Athenaeus and Xenarchus.
RP88857. Bronze AE 33, SNG BnF 1052 (same dies); cf. SNG Levante 783 (same obv. die, rev. var.); BMC Lycaonia p. 140, 51 (same); SNG Cop 221 (same); SNGvA 5848 (same), F, weak legends, a little off center, scattered porosity, a few pits, bumps and scratches, weight 18.147 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 180o, Seleucia on the Calycadnus (Silifke, Turkey) mint, Jun/Jul 251 - Jul/Aug 253 A.D.; obverse AV K ΓAI OVAI TPEBΩ ΓAΛΛOC, radiate, draped and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse CEΛEVKEΩN TΩN Π/POC / TΩ KAΛV, confronted draped busts of Apollo, laureate on left, and Tyche, on right, wearing kalathos, laurel branch before Apollo, cornucopia behind Tyche, KA∆NΩ below; huge 32.8mm bronze; $135.00 (118.80)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, 3rd Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
In Greek mythology, Solymus (Solymos) was the ancestral hero and eponym of the tribe Solymi in Pisidia and Lycia. He was a son of either Zeus or Ares; his mother's name is variously given as Chaldene, Caldene daughter of Pisidus, Calchedonia or the nymph Chalcea. Solymus is known to have been married to his own sister Milye, also a local eponymous heroine. A certain Cragus is given as Milye's second husband. A possibly different Solymus is mentioned by Ovid as a Phrygian companion of Aeneas and eponym of Sulmona.
RP85747. Bronze AE 22, SNGvA 5343; SNG Cop 338; SNG BnF -; BMC Lycia -; SNG Righetti -; SNG PfPs -, VF, well centered, high points flatly struck, light marks, weight 5.217 g, maximum diameter 21.8 mm, die axis 0o, Termessos Major mint, c. 238 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMHCCEΩN, bearded bust of Solymos right, wearing crested Corinthian helmet and cuirass; reverse AVTONOMΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left hand; rare; $115.00 (101.20)


Septimius Severus, 9 April 193 - 4 February 211 A.D., Damascus, Coele-Syria

Click for a larger photo
Damascus was an important caravan city with trade routes from southern Arabia, Palmyra, Petra, and silk routes from China all converging on it delivering eastern luxuries to Rome. Saul (later known as Paul) was on his way to Damascus to persecute Christians when he was blinded by a light from the presence of Jesus. He spent three days in Damascus, blind, until Jesus sent a disciple named Ananias to Saul. Damascus was the city in which Paul began his work as a great evangelist. Hadrian promoted Damascus to the Metropolis of Coele-Syria about 125 A.D. Severus Alexander upgraded it to a colonia in 222 A.D.
RY89578. Bronze AE 28, SNG Cop 421, Rosenberger V 20, SNG Mnchen -, aF/VF, crude style, inscriptions blundered and mostly off flan (normal for the type), weight 9.608 g, maximum diameter 23.0 mm, die axis 0o, Damascus mint, 9 Apr 193 - 4 Feb 211 A.D.; obverse CEYΠECV - AVTOK KAI (or similar), laureate, draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse ∆MACKHNΩ - MHTPΠOΛ... (or similar), turreted and draped bust of city goddess Tyche left within an arched tetrastyle shrine; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); very rare; $100.00 (88.00)


Lucius Verus, 7 March 161 - February 169 A.D., Antioch ad Hippum, Decapolis

Click for a larger photo
Hippos is an archaeological site located on a hill overlooking the Sea of Galilee in the Mt. Sussita National Park, Israel. Between the 3rd century B.C. and the 7th century A.D., Hippos was the site of a Greco-Roman city, which declined under Muslim rule and was abandoned after an earthquake in 749. Besides the fortified city itself, Hippos controlled two port facilities on the lake and an area of the surrounding countryside. Hippos was part of the Decapolis, or Ten Cities, a region in Roman Jordan, Syria and Israel that were culturally tied more closely to Greece and Rome than to the Semitic ethnoi around.
RP91033. Bronze AE 26, RPC IV Online T6576 (11 spec.); Spijkerman 19; Sofaer 13; SNG ANS 1139, VF, well centered, earthen deposits, scratches, tiny edge splits, weight 10.410 g, maximum diameter 24.8 mm, Hippos (Mt. Sussita National Park) mint, 7 Mar 161 - Feb 169 A.D.; obverse AVT KAI Λ AYPH-ΛIOC OYHPOC, laureate head right, slight drapery on far (left) shoulder; reverse ANTIO TΩ ΠP IΠ THC IEP K ACYΛOY, Tyche standing left, turreted, cornucopia in left hand, holding bridle of horse standing left on her far side; scarce; $100.00 (88.00)


Severus Alexander, 13 March 222 - March 235 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

Click for a larger photo
Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It was the seat of Philip II and of his son, Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RB79934. Bronze AE 24, Varbanov III 3735 (R4), SNG ANS 633, Moushmov 6479, SNG Cop -, F, superb portrait, attractive green patina, tight flan, weight 11.112 g, maximum diameter 24.2 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 13 Mar 222 - Mar 235 A.D.; obverse IMP C M AVR SEV ALEXANDER AVG, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, city-goddess seated left, kalathos on head, right hand raised to shoulder; $95.00 (83.60)


Termessos Major, Pisidia, Late 2nd - 3rd Century A.D.

Click for a larger photo
Alexander the Great likened Termessos, high in the Taurus Mountains, to an eagle's nest after he surrounded it but failed to conquer it in 333 B.C. An ally of Rome, Termessos was granted independent status by the Roman Senate in 71 B.C. Independence was maintained continuously for a long time, the only exception being an alliance with Amyntas king of Galatia (reigned 36 - 25 B.C.). This independence is documented also by the coins of Termessos, which bear the title "Autonomous." Termessos was abandoned after its aqueduct was destroyed by an earthquake (date unknown).
RP84971. Bronze AE 30, SNG BnF 2188 var. (same obv. die, no rev. Θ), SNG Cop 330; SNGvA 5355 var. (no Θ's); BMC Lycia p. 274, 51 var. (same), VF, uneven strike with weak areas, bumps and marks, corrosion, weight 12.799 g, maximum diameter 29.6 mm, die axis 180o, Termessos Major mint, c. 193 - 268 A.D.; obverse TEPMH-CCEΩN, laureate and bearded bust of Zeus right, Θ below; reverse TΩN MEI-ZO-NΩN, Tyche standing slightly left, head left, kalathos on head, rudder in right hand, cornucopia in left, Nike flying left behind her, crowning Tyche with wreath in right hand, palm frond in left hand, Θ low center; rare; $95.00 (83.60)




  



CLICK HERE TO SEE MORE FROM THIS CATEGORY - FORVM's PRIOR SALES



Catalog current as of Wednesday, November 20, 2019.
Page created in 11.781 seconds.
Tyche