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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Janus||View Options:  |  |  | 

Janus

Janus was the Roman god of gates, doors, doorways, time, beginnings, and endings. He is depicted with two faces in opposite directions; one looks back into the past, while the other simultaneously looks forward into the future. He is the namesake of the month January.


Roman Republic, Anonymous, 211 - 206 B.C.

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88221. Bronze as, Crawford 56/2, Sydenham 143, BMCRR Rome 373 ff., SRCV I 627, F, green patina, crack, porous, weight 29.386 g, maximum diameter 33.3 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 211 - 206 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, countermark: head right in round punch; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) above, ROMA in exergue; ex Moneta Numismatic Services; $130.00 (114.40)


Roman Republic, OPEI (Q. Opeimius?), 169 - 157 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88348. Copper as, Crawford 190/1, Sydenham 363, BMCRR Rome 598, RBW Collection 811, SRCV I 701, F, bumps and marks, obverse off center, small edge splits/cracks, weight 26.339 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 45o, Rome mint, 169 - 157 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above, linear border; reverse galley prow right, OPEI above, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below, linear border; $90.00 (79.20)


Roman Republic, L. Tituri L.f. Sabinus, 89 B.C.

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR91003. Bronze as, cf. Crawford 344/4a, Russo RBW 1305, Sydenham 701a, BMCRR Rome 2356, SRCV I 745, VF, rough, porous, weight 10.169 g, maximum diameter 28.3 mm, die axis 90o, Rome mint, 89 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse prow right, L TITVRI L F above, Victory right holding wreath before, SABINVS below; from the Eric J. Engstrom Collection; $80.00 (70.40) ON RESERVE


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88024. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, dark patina, porous, earthen encrustations, weight 23.210 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 240o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $50.00 (44.00)


Roman Republic, c. 157 - 145 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88013. Bronze as, cf. RBW Collection 848, Crawford 197 - 198B/b1, Sydenham -, Fair, dark patina, red earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 18.372 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 90o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 157 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $45.00 (39.60)


Roman Republic, c. 211 - 150 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88440. Bronze as, Fair, weight 25.628 g, maximum diameter 32.1 mm, die axis 90o, c. 211 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right; $16.00 (14.08)


Roman Republic, Quintus Marcius Libo, 148 B.C. (Perhaps a Later Imitative)

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88441. Bronze as, cf. Crawford 215/2b, RBW Collection 917, Sydenham 396a, SRCV I 724, Fair, rough, weight 18.116 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I above; reverse prow right, Q. MARC above (MA ligate), LIBO or I before, ROMA below; $16.00 (14.08)







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Catalog current as of Saturday, December 7, 2019.
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Janus