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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Gods, Non-Olympian| ▸ |Sandan||View Options:  |  |  | 

Sandan

Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Heracles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre. The Lydians believed their royal house descended from Sandan and Sardis the capital of Lydia, may have been named after Sandan. The pyre of Sandan is featured on coins of Tarsus.


Tarsos, Cilicia, 27 B.C. - 192 A.D.

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According to BMC Cilicia, Tarsos assumed the title μητροπολις (metropolis) in early Imperial times and issued pseudo autonomous types at least down to the time of Commodus.

Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
RP89900. Bronze AE 17, SNG Levante 970 (same dies), SNG BnF 1305, BMC Lycaonia - ; SNG Cop -, aVF, dark green patina with attractive earthen highlighting, weight 2.664 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, 27 B.C. - 192 A.D.; obverse turreted head of Tyche (city goddess) right, monogram behind, bead and reel border; reverse Sandan standing right on a horned goat-like animal walking right, MH/TPO (metropolis) in two lines upper left, TAPΣEΩN (clockwise on right); rare; $70.00 (Ä61.60)


Tarsos, Cilicia, c. 164 - 37 B.C.

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Sandan was a Hittite-Babylonian sun, storm, or warrior god, also perhaps associated with agriculture. The Greeks equated Sandan with Herakles (Hercules). At Tarsus an annual festival honored Sandan-Herakles, which climaxed when, as depicted on this coin, an image of the god was burned on a funeral pyre.
CM91689. Bronze AE 22, cf. SNG BnF 1326 (same c/m), SNG Levante 952 (same), SNG Cop 333 ff., BMC Lycaonia p. 180, 106 ff. (none with these controls), F, dark green patina, scratches, weight 6.847 g, maximum diameter 21.6 mm, die axis 0o, Tarsos (Tarsus, Mersin, Turkey) mint, c. 164 - 37 B.C.; obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right; countermark: radiate head of Helios within oval punch; reverse Sandan standing right on horned and winged animal, on a garlanded base and within a pyramidal pyre surmounted by a winged animal, TAPΣEΩN downward on right; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $45.00 (Ä39.60)


Antiocheia ad Kydnum (Tarsos), Cilicia, c. 175 - 164 B.C.

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Tarsos was renamed Antiocheia ad Kydnum under Antiochos IV Epiphanes, and reverted to Tarsus c. 164 B.C.
GY82106. Bronze AE 15, SNG Levante 910 - 911 var. (monograms), SNG BnF 1273 ff., BMC Lycaonia -, Lindgren -, SNG Cop -, SNGvA -, F, weight 4.199 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, obverse veiled and turreted head of Tyche right, monogram behind; reverse ANTIOXEΩN TΩN ΠPOΣ TΩI KY∆NΩI, Sandan standing right on winged and horned lion-like animal, carries bow and sword, right raised, monograms left and right; rare; SOLD







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Catalog current as of Monday, August 19, 2019.
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Sandan