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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |North Africa| ▸ |Carthage||View Options:  |  |  | 

Carthage

Carthage, located in North Africa on the Gulf of Tunis, established a hegemony over other Phoenician settlements throughout the Mediterranean, North Africa and what is now Spain. Carthage was in a constant state of struggle with the Roman Republic, which led to a series of conflicts known as the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city of Carthage, the annexation by Rome of all remaining Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire population of Carthage.Carthagian Empire Map


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, 229 - 221 B.C.

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The Second Punic War, 218 - 201 B.C., is most remembered for Hannibal's crossing of the Alps, followed by his crushing victories over Rome in the battle of the Trebia, at Trasimene, and again at Cannae. After these defeats, many Roman allies joined Carthage, prolonging the war in Italy for over a decade. Against Hannibal's skill on the battlefield, the Romans deployed the Fabian strategy. More capable in siegecraft, the Romans recaptured all the major cities that had defected. The Romans defeated an attempt to reinforce Hannibal at the battle of the Metaurus and, in Iberia, Publius Cornelius Scipio Africanus Major took New Carthage and ended Carthaginian rule over Iberia in the Battle of Ilipa. The final showdown was the Battle of Zama in Africa where Scipio Africanus defeated Hannibal, resulting in the imposition of harsh peace conditions on Carthage, which ceased to be a major power and became a Roman client-state.Hannibal's route of invasion

GS92184. Silver shekel, Viola CNP 134, Müller Afrique 126, SNG Cop VIII 291, Macdonald Hunter 67, Villaronga NAH 201, Villaronga CNH 25, VF, toned, bumps and scratches, reverse a little off center, scattered porosity, small edge split, overstruck(?), weight 7.278 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 215o, Carthage mint, 229 - 221 B.C.; obverse head of Tanit-Kore left, hair wreathed with grain; reverse horse prancing right on short exergue line, star above with eight rays around central pellet; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); scarce; $1480.00 (€1302.40)
 


Carthage, Zeugitana, North Africa, 300 - 264 B.C.

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In 278 B.C., envoys from the Sicilian cities of Agrigentum, Syracuse, and Leontini asked Pyrrhus for military aid to remove the Carthaginian dominance over that island. With an army of 20,000 infantry, 3,000 cavalry, 20 war elephants, and some 200 ships, Pyrrhus defeated the Carthaginian forces and captured the city-fortress of Eryx. Carthage sued for peace, but Pyrrhus demanded Carthage renounce its claims on Sicily entirely. Pyrrhus set his sights on conquering Carthage itself, and began outfitting an expedition. However, his ruthless treatment of the Sicilian cities and his execution of two Sicilian rulers led to such animosity that he was forced out of Sicily and abandoned his plan.
GI91726. Bronze AE 21, Viola CNP 252f, Alexandropoulos 57h, SNG Cop 164, Müller Afrique 276, VF, obverse flatly struck, off center, flan casting sprue remnant, weight 4.742 g, maximum diameter 20.6 mm, die axis 270o, Sardinian(?) mint, 300 - 264 B.C.; obverse head of Kore-Tanit left wearing barley wreath, triple-pendant earring, and necklace; reverse horse's head right, pellet before; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Carthaginians in Sicily, 300 - 289 B.C.

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At the height of its prominence, Carthage's influence extended over most of the western Mediterranean. Rivalry with Rome led to a series of conflicts, the Punic Wars. The Third Punic War ended in the complete destruction of the city, annexation by Rome of all Carthaginian territory, and the death or enslavement of the entire Carthaginian population.
SH33199. Silver tetradrachm, Jenkins Punic, Series 5a, 300 (O96/R248); SGCV II 6436; SNG Cop 90; HGC 2 295, Choice EF, toned, bold, weight 16.618 g, maximum diameter 25.5 mm, die axis 180o, Sicilian mint, obverse head of Herakles right, clad in lion's scalp; reverse horse's head left, palm tree behind, Punic legend AMHMHNTE (people of the camp) below; ex Ira & Larry Goldberg Auction 44, lot 3683 (price realized $4,300 plus fees); SOLD







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REFERENCES|

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Catalog current as of Tuesday, January 21, 2020.
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Carthage