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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Themes & Provenance| ▸ |Personifications| ▸ |Constantinopolis||View Options:  |  |  |   

Constantinopolis on Ancient Coins

Byzantine Empire, Justin II, 15 November 565 - 5 October 578 A.D.

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Justin was unable to hold the territory Justinian had restored. Most of Italy and parts of Spain were quickly lost to the Lombards and Visigoths. Refusal to pay tribute to the Sassanids, resulted in protracted war. The burdens of office drove him insane and his successor was regent for the last four years of his reign.
SH91674. Gold solidus, DOC I 5d, Wroth BMC 11, Tolstoi 10, Hahn MIB II 1, Sommer 5.3, SBCV 346, Morrisson BnF -, Ratto -, Choice EF, mint luster, well centered, broad flan, flan flaw obv. 12:00, weight 4.490 g, maximum diameter 20.4 mm, die axis 180o, 8th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 Nov 565 - 567 A.D.; obverse D N IVSTINVS P P AVG, helmeted and cuirassed bust facing, helmet with crest, trefoil ornament and pendilia, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, shield ornamented with horseman in left hand; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG H (victory of the three emperors, 8th officina), Constantinopolis enthroned facing, head right, wearing crested helmet, aegis on right shoulder, spear in right hand, globus cruciger in left hand, star left, CONOB in exergue; ex Maxwell Hunt Collection; very scarce; $800.00 SALE |PRICE| $720.00


Lot of 20 Roman Empire City of Constantinople Commemoratives Bronzes 330 - 346 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
LT85418. Bronze reduced centenionalis, SRCV IV 16444 ff. (various mints), all VF, nice coins, 330 - 346 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, mintmark in exergue; one with soldiers with standard reverse, unattributed mint or issue, no flips or tags, the actual coins in the photographs, as-is, no returns; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Lot of 20 Roman Empire City of Constantinople Commemorative Bronzes 330 - 346 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
LT85420. Bronze reduced centenionalis, SRCV IV 16444 ff. (various mints), VF, all nice coins, 330 - 346 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, mintmark in exergue; unattributed mint or issue, correction: one of the 20 coins is a Roma commem. , no flips or tags, the actual coins in the photographs, as-is, no returns; $200.00 SALE |PRICE| $180.00


Byzantine Anonymous Follis of Christ, Class A3, Basil II & Constantine VIII, c. 1023 - 11 November 1028 A.D.

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The emperor's name and portrait are not part of the design on the Byzantine types referred to as anonymous folles. Instead of the earthly king, these coins depict Jesus Christ, King of Kings.
BZ91327. Bronze anonymous follis, Anonymous follis of Christ class A3; Grierson-NumisWiki ornaments 47; DOC III-2 A2.47, Wroth BMC 4, Ratto 1974, Sommer 40.3.4, SBCV 1818, EF, unevenly and double struck, reverse off center, weight 10.036 g, maximum diameter 29.4 mm, die axis 180o, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 1023 - 11 Nov 1028 A.D.; obverse + EMMANOVHΛ (Latinized Hebrew: Emmanuel - "God with us"), facing nimbate bust of Christ, pallium and colobium, Gospels in both hands, IC - XC (Greek abbreviation: Iisos Xrists - Jesus Christ) across field; reverse + IhSuS / XRISTuS / bASILEu / bASILE (Greek: Jesus Christ King of Kings), square above and below inscription; $180.00 SALE |PRICE| $162.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL82770. Billon reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 3 (also 2nd officina), RIC VII Trier 543, LRBC I 66, SRCV IV 16445, Cohen VII 21, EF, sharp detail, slightly off center on a tight flan, clashed reverse die, weight 2.398 g, maximum diameter 16.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRS in exergue; $105.00 SALE |PRICE| $95.00


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 330 - 331 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL92313. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Lyons 246 (R2), LRBC I 191, SRCV V 16449, Cohen VII 22, Hunter V -, EF, choice obverse, attractive brown patina, flow lines, reverse slightly off center, tiny edge cracks, weight 2.975 g, maximum diameter 18.0 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Lugdunum (Lyon, France) mint, 330 - 331 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, PLG in exergue; $90.00 SALE |PRICE| $81.00


Honorius, 23 January 393 - 15 August 423 A.D.

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In 406, with the aid of the chieftain of the Huns, Uldin, Stilicho crushed an army of 20,000 barbarians led by Radagaisus at Fiesole. Stilicho executed Radagaisus, and the surviving barbarians were either incorporated into the Roman army or sold as slaves.
RL88047. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Constantinopolis 89c (R), LRBC II 2192, SRCV V 20996, Cohen VIII 23, DOCLR -, VF, dark patina with earthen highlighting, tight flan, weight 2.143 g, maximum diameter 15.2 mm, die axis 0o, 4th officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, 15 May 292 - 17 Jan 395 A.D.; obverse D N HONORIVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right, star left; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), Honorius on horseback right, raising right hand, reins in left hand, CONS∆ in exergue; $55.00 SALE |PRICE| $49.50


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 332 - 333 A.D.

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Constantine the Great and his sons issued small bronze coins commemorating the old capitol, Rome, and the new capitol, Constantinople, to symbolize the equality of the two cities and the new importance of Constantinople to the empire.
RL92179. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Trier 543, LRBC I 66, SRCV IV 16445, Cohen VII 22, Hunter V 3 var. (2nd officina), VF, nice green patina, well centered, light earthen deposits, tiny edge crack, tiny edge chip on reverse, weight 1.702 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 180o, 1st officina, Treveri (Trier, Germany) mint, 332 - 333 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, TRP in exergue; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); $36.00 SALE |PRICE| $32.40


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 331 and 333 - 334 A.D.

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On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL88794. Billon reduced centenionalis, RIC VII Cyzicus 92 (R4), LRBC I 1220, SRCV IV 16476, Cohen VII 22, Hunter V 17 var. (2nd officina), F, mottled green and red patina, light earthen encrustation, spots of corrosion, weight 1.907 g, maximum diameter 17.7 mm, die axis 180o, 5th officina, Cyzicus (Kapu Dagh, Turkey) mint, 331 and 333 - 334 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLI, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, wreath left, SMKE in exergue; $14.00 SALE |PRICE| $12.60


City of Constantinople Commemorative, 333 - 335 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
On 11 May 330, Constantine I refounded Byzantium, renamed it Constantinopolis after himself, and moved the capital of the Roman Empire from Rome to his new city. The new capital was Christian, old gods and traditions were either replaced or assimilated into a framework of Christian symbolism. Constantine built the new Church of the Holy Apostles on the site of a temple to Aphrodite. Generations later there was the story that a divine vision led Constantine to this spot. The capital would often be compared to the 'old' Rome as Nova Roma Constantinopolitana, the "New Rome of Constantinople." Special commemorative coins were issued with types for both Rome and Constantinople to advertise the importance of the new capital.
RL88638. Bronze reduced centenionalis, Hunter V 20 (also 1st officina), RIC VII Alexandria 64 (R1), SRCV IV 16481, LRBC I 1432, Cohen VII 21, aVF/aF, well centered, dark patina, rough, weight 1.625 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, 1st officina, Alexandria mint, 333 - 335 A.D.; obverse CONSTANTINOPOLIS, laureate and helmeted bust of Constantinopolis left, wearing imperial cloak, scepter over left shoulder; reverse Victory standing left, right foot on prow, scepter in right hand, resting left hand on grounded shield, SMALA in exergue; scarce; $4.50 (3.96)




  



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Constantinopolis