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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Geographic - All Periods| ▸ |Anatolia| ▸ |Phrygia| ▸ |Other Phrygia||View Options:  |  |  | 

Ancient Greek Coins of Phrygia

Kings of Galatia, Deiotaros, Tetrarch 63 - 59 B.C., King 59 - 40 B.C.

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Deiotarus was chief of the Celtic Tolistobogii tribe in western Galatia and became King of Galatia. He was a faithful ally of Rome against Mithridates VI of Pontus, for which he was rewarded by Pompey. Caesar pardoned him for siding with Pompey in the civil war but he was deprived of some of his dominions. After Caesar's death, Mark Antony, for a large payment, publicly announced that, in accordance with instructions left by Caesar, Deiotarus was to resume possession of all the territory of which he had been deprived. When civil war broke out again, Deiotarus supported the anti-Caesarian party of Brutus and Cassius, but after the Battle of Philippi in 42 B.C., he went over to the triumvirs. He retained his kingdom until his death at a very advanced age.
GB88403. Bronze AE 27, SNGvA 6103 (same countermark); Arslan K4; SNG BnF 2333; BMC Galatia p. 1, 1; HGC 7 774 (R2); see RPC I p. 536, aVF, countermark VF, dark brown and green patina, off center, reverse flattened opposite countermark, weight 12.715 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain Phrygian mint, 59 - 40 B.C.; obverse bust of winged Nike right, hair in a bunch behind; countermark: turreted head of Tyche in round punch; reverse eagle standing right on a sheathed sword, wings open, head turned back left, flanked by pilei of the Dioscuri each with a star above, BAΣIΛEΩΣ above, ∆HIOTAPOV below; very rare; $270.00 (€237.60)
 


Valerian I, October 253 - c. June 260 A.D., Cotiaeum, Phrygia

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Asklepios is the Greek god of medicine. Hygieia is the goddess of health and Askelpois' daughter. Telesphoros is Asklepios' assistant. Asclepius learned the secrets of keeping death at bay after observing one snake bringing another snake healing herbs. Woman seeking fertility, the sick, and the injured slept in his temples in chambers where non-poisonous snakes were left to crawl on the floor and provide healing.
RP91190. Bronze tetrassarion, SNG München 333; SNGvA 3791; SNG Hunterian 2048; BMC Phrygia p. 177, 95 var. (exergue in two lines...Ω/N); SNG Cop -; SNG Righetti -, Choice VF, well centered, dark patina, highest points flatly struck, small edge split, central depressions, weight 6.308 g, maximum diameter 25.2 mm, die axis 180o, Cotiaeum (Kutahya, Turkey) mint, Oct 253 - c. Jun 260 A.D.; obverse AYT K Π ΛIK OYAΛEPIANON, radiate, draped, and cuirassed bust right, seen from behind; reverse EΠI Π AI ∆HMHTPIANOY IΠΠ (P. Ailios Demetrios, archon and hipparchos), Hygieia, on left, standing right, feeding serpent in right hand from patera in left hand; Asklepios, on right, standing facing, head left, leaning with right hand on serpent-entwined staff; Telesphoros between them, standing facing, ΛP/X in two lines above center, KOTIAEΩN in exergue; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Augustus, 16 January 27 B.C. - 19 August 14 A.D., Kibyra, Phrygia

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Kibyra (Cibyra) near the modern town of Gölhisar in south-west Turkey, was possibly originally settled by Lydians. The city was in the far south of Phrygia adjoining Lycia. It is uncertain whether the city was part of the Province of Asia or of Lycia in the early imperial period. According to Strabo, the Lydian language was still being spoken by a multicultural population in the 1st century B.C. Thus Kibyra was the last place where the Lydian culture, by then extinct in Lydia proper, persevered.
RP89888. Bronze AE 17, RPC I 2882 (5 spec. online); SNG Fitzwilliam 4954 (same dies); SNGvA 3727; Imhoof GM p. 397, 88; Waddington 5819; SNG Cop -; BMC Phrygia -, aVF, green patina, most of ethnic off flan, small edge splits, weight 4.425 g, maximum diameter 17.2 mm, die axis 270o, Kibyra (near Golhisar, Turkey) mint, obverse bare head right; reverse capricorn right, head turned back left, CEBATOC above, KIBYPATWN counterclockwise below and upward on right; rare; $150.00 (€132.00)
 


Cotiaeum, Phrygia, c. 253 - 258 A.D.

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Cybele was born a hermaphrodite, but castrated by the gods, she became female. Heeding the Sibylline oracle the senate brought her worship to Rome in 204 B.C. as the first officially sanctioned Eastern cult. After approval, they were dismayed to learn that the priesthood required voluntary self-castration, which was abhorrent to the Romans. Romans were barred from entering the priesthood or even entering the priest's sanctuary. The eunuch priests, recruited from outside Rome, were confined to their sanctuary, leaving only to parade in the streets during festivals in April. Claudius removed the bans on Roman participation, making worship of Cybele and her consort Attis part of the state religion."Cybele

RP89894. Bronze assarion, BMC Phrygia p. 161, 15; Waddington 5883; SNG Cop -; SNGvA -; SNG Mün -; SNG Tüb -, VF, green patina, slightly off center, central depressions, weight 3.101 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 0o, Cotiaeum (Kütahya, Turkey) mint, c. 253 - 258 A.D.; obverse ∆HMOC, bearded head of Demos right; reverse KOTIAEΩN, Cybele enthroned left, phiale in extended right hand, left arm resting on tympanum, lions flanking throne; very rare; $90.00 (€79.20) ON RESERVE


Abbaitis-Mysoi, Phrygia, 165 - 129 B.C.

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Abbaetae Mysi were an Mysian people that occupied a district in western Phrygia, called Abbaitis, of which Ancyra and Synaiis were the chief cities. The coins were probably struck at Ancyra and the style belongs to the middle of the 2nd century B.C.
GB87758. Bronze AE 21, BMC Phrygia 1, 4; SNG Cop 1; SNG Tübingen 3889; SNGvA 3329 var. (no monogram); HGC 7 749; SNG München -, VF, light bumps and marks, porosity, weight 6.431 g, maximum diameter 21.0 mm, die axis 0o, Ankyra (Ankara, Turkey) mint, 165 - 129 B.C.; obverse laureate head of Zeus right; reverse MYΣΩN / ABBAITΩN, inscription divided by thunderbolt, monogram (magistrate?) below, all within oak wreath; $80.00 (€70.40)
 


Ankyra in Abbaitis, Phrygia, c. 193 - 217 A.D.

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Ancyra means anchor in Greek. There were two cities named Ancyra in Anatolia, the one in Abbaitis, Phrygia that issued this coin, and another larger city in Galatia, now the capitol of Turkey. Ankyra in Abbaitis may have struck autonomous coins as Abbaetae Mysi in the 2nd century B.C. Under Rome, Ankyra in Abbaitis struck civic coinage from the rule of Nero to the rule of Philip the Arab.
RP87095. Brass AE 22, BMC Phrygia p. 59, 11 ff.; SNG Cop 132; SNGvA 3424; SNG München 88 var.; SNG Tübingen 3937; SNG Leypold 1421-1422 var., aVF, weight 8.072 g, maximum diameter 21.4 mm, die axis 180o, Ankyra in Abbaitis mint, Severan period, c. 193 - 217 A.D.; obverse ΘEON CYN-KLHTON, young draped bust of the Senate right; reverse AN/KYPA/NWN in three lines within laurel wreath; $55.00 (€48.40)
 


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Prymnessos, Phrygia

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Prymnessos is the modern day town of Sülün in central Turkey.

Dikaiosyne was the personified spirit (daimona) of righteousness and justice.
RP89868. Bronze AE 22, vA Phrygiens II 1060; RPC II 1396; SNG Cop 667; BMC Phrygia p. 365, 26; Lindgren III 612a, aF, uneven weak strike, much of legends unstruck, marks, porosity, weight 5.250 g, maximum diameter 22.0 mm, die axis 0o, Prymnessus (Sulun, Turkey) mint, 29 Aug 79 - 28 Aug 80 A.D.; obverse TI AYTOKPATOPA KAICAP, laureate head right; reverse ΠPYMNHCCIC, Dikaiosyne seated left, holding scales, grain ears and poppy; only two sales of this type recorded on Coin Archives in the last two decades; rare; $55.00 (€48.40)
 







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REFERENCES|

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Forrer, L. Descriptive Catalogue of the Collection of Greek Coins formed by Sir Hermann Weber, Vol. III, Part 2. (London, 1929).
Head, B. A Catalogue of Greek Coins in the British Museum, Phrygia. (London, 1906).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Northern and Central Anatolia, Pontos, Paphlagonia, Bithynia, Phrygia...5th to 1st Centuries BC. HGC 7. (Lancaster, PA, 2012).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Kleinasiatische Münzen. (Vienna, 1901-2).
Imhoof-Blumer, F. Zur griechischen und römischen Münzkunde. (Geneva, 1908).
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Mildenberg, L. & S. Hurter, eds. The Dewing Collection of Greek Coins. ACNAC 6. (New York, 1985).
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Sear, D. Greek Coins and Their Values, Vol. 2: Asia and Africa. (London, 1979).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Münzsammlung Universität Tübingen, Part| 6: Phrygien-Kappadokien; Römische Provinzprägungen in Kleinasien. (Berlin, 1998).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Deutschland, Sammlung Hans Von Aulock, Vol. 2: Caria, Lydia, Phrygia, Lycia, Pamphylia. (Berlin, 1962).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain I, Part 2, The Newham Davis Coins in the Marischal College Aberdeen. (London, 1936).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain III, R.C. Lockett Collection, Part 5: Lesbos - Cyrenaica. Addenda. (gold and silver). (London, 1949).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IV, Fitzwilliam Museum, Leake and General Collections, Part 6: Asia Minor: Pontus-Phrygia. (London, 1965).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain IX, British Museum, Part 1: The Black Sea. (London, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XI, The William Stancomb Collection of Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Oxford, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Great Britain XII, The Hunterian Museum, Univ. of Glasgow, Part 1: Roman Provincial Coins: Spain-Kingdoms of Asia Minor. (Oxford, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Österreich, Sammlung Leypold, Kleinasiatische Münzen der Kaiserzeit, Vol. II: Phrygia-Commagene. (Vienna, 2004).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Russia, State Pushkin Museum of Fine Arts: Coins of the Black Sea Region. (Leuven, Belgium, 2011).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Schweiz II, Katalog der Sammlung Jean-Pierre Righetti im Bernischen Historischen Museum. (Bern, 1993).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Turkey 5: Tire Museum (Izmir), Vol. 1: Roman Provincial Coins From Ionia, Lydia, Phrygia, etc. (Istanbul, 2011).
von Aulock, H. Münzen und Städte Phrygiens. (Tübingen, 1987).
Waddington, W., E. Babelon & T. Reinach. Recueil Général des Monnaies Grecques d'Asie Minuere, Vol. I. (Paris, 1904-25).

Catalog current as of Monday, October 21, 2019.
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Phrygia