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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Twelve Caesars| ▸ |Titus||View Options:  |  |  |   

Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

Titus Flavius Vespasianus was the hero of the Judean rebellion (from the Roman perspective) and a very popular emperor. He presided over the empire during the cataclysmic eruption of Vesuvius, which buried half the towns of the Bay of Naples, including Pompeii. He was described as handsome, charming and generous. Titus once complained that he had lost a day because twenty-four hours passed without his bestowing a gift. He was, however, generous to a fault, which depleted the treasury. If he had ruled longer, he might have brought the empire to bankruptcy and lost his popularity. He died of illness in 81 A.D., succeeded by his brother Domitian.


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Vespasian, in 70 A.D., and Titus, in 71 A.D., both safely returned from the Judaea to Rome by sea voyage. This reverse, copied from Octavian, was struck on coins of both Vespasian and Titus to honor Neptune Redux and thank him for ensuring their safe return.
SH37595. Gold aureus, SRCV I 2418; RIC II-1 Vesp. 365; Cohen I 120; BnF III 65, VF, nice high relief portrait, a few marks, weight 7.068 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 72 - 73 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate head right; reverse NEP RED, Neptune standing left, foot on globe, acrostolium in right hand, scepter in left hand; SOLD


Vespasian, 1 July 69 - 24 June 79 A.D., Titus & Domitian Reverse

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On 14 April 70 A.D. Titus surrounded Jerusalem. He allowed pilgrims to enter to celebrate Passover but this was a trap to put pressure on supplies of food and water; he refused to allow them to leave. On 10 May he began his assault on the walls. The third wall fell on 25 May. The second wall fell on 30 May. On 20 July Titus stormed the Temple Mount. On 4 August 70 A.D. Titus destroyed the Temple. The Jewish fast of Tisha B'Av mourns the Fall of Jerusalem annually on this date.
SH77005. Silver denarius, RIC II part I, 16 (R); BnF III 1; RSC II 5; BMCRE II 2; Hunter I 2; SRCV I 2399, EF/aEF, light toning, tight flan, some light bumps and marks, among the finest examples of the type, weight 3.414 g, maximum diameter 17.5 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, Jan - Jun (or later) 70 A.D.; obverse IMP CAESAR VESPASIANVS AVG, laureate head right; reverse CAESAR AVG F COS CAESAR AVG F PR, confronted bare heads of Titus right (on left) and Domitian left (on right); from the Jyrki Muona Collection; ex Helios Numismatik auction 4 (14 Oct 2009), lot 302; ex A. Lynn Collection; rare; SOLD


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The reverse type copies a silver quinarius of Augustus, which referred to return of control of the Province of Asia after victory over Mark Antony. The cista mystica, the traditional symbol on the coinage of Pergamum (a symbol of Asia known to most Romans) is surmounted by Victory.
SH33106. Gold aureus, RIC II-1 785; BMCRE II 173; BN 151; Hunter 232, 14; Calicó 750; Cohen 163; SRCV I 2421, F, weight 6.778 g, maximum diameter 20.0 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, as caesar, 75 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR IMP VESPASIAN, laureate head right; reverse PONTIF TR P COS IIII (priest, holder of Tribunitian power, consul for the 4th time), Victoria standing left Cista Mystica, wreath extended in right, flanked by two snakes; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Judea Capta

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SH58765. Orichalcum semis, RIC II 504, Hendin 1598, Cohen I 112, BMCRE II 259 (notes mint uncertain), BnF III 275 (Rome), RPC II -, gF, weight 4.116 g, maximum diameter 16.7 mm, die axis 180o, uncertain eastern (Thracian?) mint, 80 - 81 A.D.; obverse IMP T CAESAR DIVI VESPAS F AVG, laureate head right; reverse IVD - CAP / S - C across fields, palm tree, flanked by a mourning Jewess captive seated left to the left, helmet and yoke to the right; ex Ancient Imports (Marc Breitsprecher); rare; SOLD


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The fantastic elephant on the reverse boasts of the spectacular grand opening of the Roman Colosseum, which had the capacity to seat 50,000 spectators. Construction, begun by Vespasian c. 72 A.D., was completed by Titus in 80. The spectacular games held for the dedication lasted 100 days and nights, consisting primarily of gladiatorial combats and wild animal fights. Some 5,000 animals, including elephants, were slaughtered. Martial tells of an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor!
SH37532. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 115; RSC II 303; BMCRE II 43; BnF III 37; SRCV I 2512, Choice EF, weight 3.339 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 80 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, elephant standing left; ; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Imperial Seal Box

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When the Romans sent important small packages by courier, such as documents or valuables, they were were placed in strong leather or cloth bags, which were sealed with a stout cord, the knot covered in wax and impressed with the sender's signet. To protect the wax seal, it and the knot were encased in a small, ornamental metal box with an hinged lid and two holes in the back for the cord. In addition, the lid could be kept closed by further cords sewn to the package and tied around it. Hinged boxes used for this purpose have been found in Britain, where they tend to date to the 2nd and 3rd centuries and are mostly of enameled bronze. However, they certainly started earlier. Hattatt illustrated an example found in Ostia bearing the portraits of Hadrian and Sabina (p. 464, 151) and seal boxes with portraits of Vespasian and Domitian have been found in London and must have been used by high officials (P. Salway, A History of Roman Britain [Oxford 2001], p. 381). This was certainly the case with this piece, especially given its splendid portrait of Titus, which was surely made by workers in the imperial mint in Rome and then sent out for official use in the provinces. See Roman| Seal| Boxes| by Colin| Andrews| - http://www.ukdfd.co.uk/pages/roman-seal-boxes.html for more information, as well as other examples of the type.
AS75699. cf. Hattatt ABOA, pp. 461 ff. (for general type); Nomos I 144 (cover only, head right), nice green patina, hing broken, Piriform-shaped bronze box with hinged cover, decorated with laureate head of Titus left, done in repoussé work; base perforated with three holes; 3.51g, 24mm x 17mm, 9mm (depth); ex Triton XIII (5-6 Jan 2010), lot 314; very rare; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Judea Capta

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Judea Capta issue.
SH43433. Silver denarius, RIC II 1562 (Vespasian); RPC II 1934; RSC II 392, gVF, toned, weight 3.463 g, maximum diameter 17.4 mm, die axis 180o, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, as caesar, 72 A.D.; obverse T CAES IMP VESP PON TR POT, laureate and draped bust right; reverse Palm tree flanked Titus and Judaea; on left, Titus standing right, spear in right and parazonium in left hand, left foot placed on globe; on right, Judaea mourning, seated right; SOLD


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Ephesus peaked during the 1st and 2nd century A.D. when it was second in importance and size only to Rome, with a population estimated at 400,000 to 500,000 in 100 A.D. The city was famous for the Temple of Artemis, the Library of Celsus, and its theater, seating 25,000 spectators. Ephesus also had several large bath complexes and one of the most advanced aqueduct systems in the ancient world. Water powered numerous mills, one of which has been identified as a sawmill for marble. The city and temple were destroyed by the Goths in 263 A.D., marking the decline of the city's splendor.
SH42461. Silver denarius, RPC II 843, RIC II Vesp 1440, RSC II 39, gVF/EF, weight 2.926 g, maximum diameter 18.8 mm, die axis 180o, Ephesus mint, as caesar, 77 - 78 A.D.; obverse IMPERATOR I CAESAR AVGVSTI F, laureate head right; reverse CONCORDIA AVG (harmony of the Emperor), Ceres seated left on ornate chair, grain in right hand, scepter in left hand, EPE in exergue; obverse a little rough, reverse very sharp; very rare; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D.

Click for a larger photo
The fantastic elephant on the reverse boasts of the spectacular grand opening of the Roman Colosseum, which had the capacity to seat 50,000 spectators. Construction, begun by Vespasian c. 72 A.D., was completed by Titus in 80. The spectacular games held for the dedication lasted 100 days and nights, consisting primarily of gladiatorial combats and wild animal fights. Some 5,000 animals, including elephants, were slaughtered. Martial tells of an elephant, who after dispatching a bull in the arena, knelt before the emperor!
RS86436. Silver denarius, RIC II-1 115; RSC II 303; BMCRE II 43; BnF III 37; SRCV I 2512, EF, well centered and struck, some border and legend letters not fully struck due to filled die, bumps and marks, weight 3.151 g, maximum diameter 18.4 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 80 A.D.; obverse IMP TITVS CAES VESPASIAN AVG P M, laureate head right; reverse TR P IX IMP XV COS VIII P P, elephant standing left; SOLD


Titus, 24 June 79 - 13 September 81 A.D., Judaea Capta issue

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Part of the Judaea Capta series commemorating the Jewish War.
RB08500. Orichalcum sestertius, Hendin 777, RIC II 640, Cohen I 383, gF, weight 25.82 g, maximum diameter 35.2 mm, die axis 180o, Rome mint, 72 A.D.; obverse T CAESAR VESPASIAN IMP IIII PON TR POT II COS II, laureate head right; reverse VICTORIA AVGVSTI (the victory of the Emperor), Victory standing right, foot on helmet, inscribing shield hung on palm tree, S - C (senatus consulto) flanking across the field below center; scarce; SOLD




  




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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

DIVOTITO
IMPERATORTCAESARAVGVSTIF
IMPTCAESARCOSIII
IMPTCAESARVESPASIANVSAVG
IMPTCAESVESPASIANAVGPM
IMPTCAESVESPAVGPMTRPCOSVIII
IMPTCAESVESPAVGPMTRPPPCOSVIII
IMPTITVSCAESVESPASIANAVGPM
IMPTITVSCAEVESPASIANVSAVGPM
IMPTVESPAVGCOSVIII
TCAESARIMPCOSIIICENS
TCAESARIMPCOSIIII
TCAESARIMPVESP
TCAESARIMPVESPASIAN
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVS
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVSCOSIII
TCAESARIMPVESPASIANVSCOSVI
TCAESARVESPASIANVS
TCAESIMP
TCAESIMPAVGFTRPCOSVICENSOR
TCAESIMPPONTRPCOSIICENS
TCAESIMPVESPCEN
TCAESIMPVESPCENS
TCAESIMPVESPPONTRPOT
TCAESIMPVESPPONTRPCENS
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPONTRPOTCOSIIICENS
TCAESVESPASIANIMPPTRPCOSII


REFERENCES|

American Numismatic Society (ANS) Collections Database Online - http://numismatics.org/search/search
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Burnett, A. & M. Amandry. Roman Provincial Coinage II: From Vespasian to Domitian (AD 69-96). (London, 1999).
Butcher, Kevin. Coinage in Roman Syria: Northern Syria, 64 BC - AD 253. Royal Numismatic Society Special Publication 34. (London, 2004).
Calicó, E. Xavier. The Roman Avrei, Vol. I: From the Republic to Pertinax, 196 BC - 193 AD. (Barcelona, 2003).
Carradice, I.A. & T.V. Buttrey. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol. II, Part 1: From AD 69 to 96. (London, 2007).
Cayón, J. Los Sestercios del Imperio Romano, Vol. I: De Pompeyo Magno a Matidia (Del 81 a.C. al 117 d.C.). (Madrid, 1984).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Giard, J-B. Le monnayage de l'atelier de Lyon, De Claude Ier à Vespasien (41-78 après J.-C.), et au temps de Clodius Albinus (196-197 après J.-C.). (Wetteren, 2000).
Giard, Jean-Baptiste. Monnaies de l'Empire romain, III Du soulèvement de 68 après J.-C. a Nerva. Catalogue Bibliothèque nationale de France. (Paris, 1998).
Hendin, D. Guide to Biblical Coins, 5th Edition. (Amphora, 2010).
Mattingly, H. & R.A.G. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 2: Vespasian to Domitian. (London, 1930).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. I. Augustus to Nerva. (Oxford, 1962).
Seaby, H.A. & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Vol. II: Tiberius to Commodus. (London, 1979).
Sear, D.R. Roman Coins and Their Values, The Millennium Edition, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Monday, September 16, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Titus