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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |The Late Empire||View Options:  |  |  |   

Coins of the Late Roman Empire

Aelia Flaccilla, Augusta 19 January 379 - 386 A.D., Wife of Theodosius I

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The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL91441. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Constantinopolis 55.2 (S), LRBC II 2149, SRCV V 20611, Cohen VIII 4, Hunter V 3 ff. var. (5th officina), gF, well centered, near black patina, red earthen deposits, scratches, weight 3.757 g, maximum diameter 23.4 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Constantinople (Istanbul, Turkey) mint, c. 25 Aug 383 - 386 A.D.; obverse AEL FLACCILLA AVG, diademed and draped bust right, hair in plait up back and top of head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right, inscribing Christogram on shield set on column, CONB in exergue; scarce; $110.00 (96.80)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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Marcian indirectly saved Rome from Attila the Hun. In 452, Attila captured and ransacked Aquileia, Milan, and other cities in Northern Italy. It seemed Attila would soon attack Rome itself, whose walls were weaker than some cities Attila had already captured. Meanwhile, however, Marcian's Eastern Roman forces had taken the offensive across the Danube, attacking the breadbasket of the Hunnic Empire. The loss of food supply from Attila's own land, and a famine and plague in Italy, depleted Attila's forces, allowing the Western Roman Empire to bribe him into returning to his homeland. Back home, Attila threatened to invade the Eastern Empire and enslave the entirety of it. Marcian and Aspar ignored his threats. The Eastern Empire had already paid Attila about six tons of gold, yet he still threatened them. They reasoned that gold would be better spent building up armies. Attila's attack never came, as he died unexpectedly in 453, either from hemorrhaging or alcoholic suffocation, after celebrating a marriage to one of his many wives. Attila's tribal confederation empire fell apart within a year after his death. Marcian settled numerous tribes, formerly under Attila, within Eastern Roman lands as foederati (subject tribes which gave military service in exchange for various benefits). Map 450 A.D.
RL89178. Bronze nummus, RIC X Marcian 548 (S), LRBC II 2463, SRCV V 21396, DOCLR 507, aVF, dark green patina, typical tight flan, weight 1.363 g, maximum diameter 9.6 mm, die axis 180o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, obverse D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian monogram (RIC monogram 5) in wreath, NIC in exergue (off flan); scarce; $90.00 (79.20)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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Victory or Nike is seen with wings in most statues and paintings, with one of the most famous being the Winged Victory of Samothrace. Most other winged deities in the Greek pantheon had shed their wings by Classical times. Nike is the goddess of strength, speed, and victory. Nike was a very close acquaintance of Athena and is thought to have stood in Athena's outstretched hand in the statue of Athena located in the Parthenon. Victory or Nike is also one of the most commonly portrayed figures on Greek and Roman coins.
RL89957. Bronze half centenionalis, Hunter V 26 (also 2nd officina), RIC IX Aquileia 47a (S), SRCV V 20358, LRBC II 1091, Cohen VIII -, gF, centered, green patina, scratches and marks, weight 1.512 g, maximum diameter 13.04 mm, die axis 0o, 2nd officina, Aquileia mint, 25 Aug 383 - 387 A.D.; obverse D N PLA VANENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl diademed draped and cuirassed bust right; reverse VICTORIA AVGGG (victory of the three emperors), two victories facing each other, each raising a wreath between them, SMAQS in exergue; scarce; $90.00 (79.20)


Eudoxia, Augusta 9 January 400 - Early October 404 A.D., Wife of Arcadius

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The Christogram (also called a Monogramma Christi or Chrismon) is a ligature of Chi (X) and Rho (P), the first two letters of Christ in Greek. It was among the earliest symbols of Christianity. The crucifix was rarely used in early Christian iconography, perhaps because most people then had personally witnessed its gruesome use for public execution.
RL91462. Bronze centenionalis, Hunter V 4 (also 3rd officina), RIC X Arcadius 104 (S), LRBC II 2800, DOCLR 288, SRCV V 20895, VF, dark patina, well centered on a tight flan, weight 2.484 g, maximum diameter 16.6 mm, die axis 180o, 3rd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 401 - 403 A.D.; obverse AEL EVDOXIA AVG, diademed and draped bust right with hand of God holding wreath over her head; reverse SALVS REIPVBLICAE (health of the Republic), Victory seated right on cuirass, inscribing Christogram on shield resting on cippus, ANTΓ in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; scarce; $90.00 (79.20)


Marcian, 24 August 450 - 31 January 457 A.D.

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The Column of Marcian was dedicated to Marcian, built by the praefectus urbi Tatianus, sometime between 450 and 452. It still stands in modern Istanbul, though the statue of Marcian which originally topped it has been lost. Marcian also had a statue in the Forum of Arcadius, which contained the statues of several of Arcadius' successors.Column of Marcian
RL87908. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X Marcian 553 (R), LRBC II 2464, SRCV V 21396, Hunter V 12 var. (monogram variation), VF, well centered on a tight flan, green patina, earthen encrustation, small edge crack, weight 0.978 g, maximum diameter 11.1 mm, die axis 0o, Nicomedia (Izmit, Turkey) mint, c 450 - 457 A.D.; obverse D N MARCIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse Marcian monogram (RIC monogram 4) in undivided wreath, no cross above, NIC in exergue; ex Beast Coins; rare; $85.00 (74.80)


Leo I, 7 February 457 - 18 January 474 A.D.

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Leo I (Latin: Flavius Valerius Leo Augustus; 401 18 January 474) was Eastern Roman Emperor from 457 to 474. A native of Dacia Aureliana near historic Thrace, he was known as Leo the Thracian. Ruling the for nearly 20 years, Leo proved to be a capable ruler. He oversaw many ambitious political and military plans, aimed mostly at aiding the faltering Western Roman Empire and recovering its former territories. He is notable for being the first Eastern Emperor to legislate in Greek rather than Latin. He is commemorated as a Saint in the Orthodox Church, with his feast day on January 20.
RL87910. Bronze half centenionalis, RIC X 693 (R), LRBC II 2264, DOCLR 565, cf. SRCV 21441 ff., Hunter V -, VF, tight flan, crude, weight 0.580 g, maximum diameter 8.5 mm, die axis 0o, uncertain mint, c. 462 - 472 A.D.; obverse D N LEO P F AVG (or similar, all off flan or unstruck), pearl-diademed, draped [and cuirassed?] bust right; reverse Leo's Latin monogram within wreath, mintmark in exergue (off flan); ex Beast Coins; rare; $85.00 (74.80)


The Origins of The Anastasian Currency Reform

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BL20293. Book The Origins of The Anastasian Currency Reform by D. M. Metcalf, hardcover, 105 pages, 12 plates, ex University of Chicago library; $80.00 (70.40)


Germanic Tribes, Pseudo-Imperial Coinage, c. 425 - 450 A.D.

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This type was minted by and used as currency by Germanic tribes outside the Roman Empire. It copied Roman type issued under Theodosius I. While official late Roman imperial bronze coinage was sometimes a bit crude, the emperor's hairstyle was never quite like this.
ME92815. Bronze barbarous imitative, for the Roman prototype see: RIC X Theodosius II 440 ff., SRCV V 21231 ff. (official, half centenionalis, various mints, 425 - 435 A.D.), EF, crude imitative style, small ragged flan, encrustation, weight 0.586 g, maximum diameter 9.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, c. 425 - 450 A.D.; obverse D N THEODOSIVS P F AVG (or similar, almost entirely off flan, likely blundered), diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse cross in wreath, wreath closed at the bottom with IIXII (or similar) on exergue line; $80.00 (70.40)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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The ruins of Antioch on the Orontes lie near the modern city of Antakya, Turkey. Founded near the end of the 4th century B.C. by Seleucus I Nicator, one of Alexander the Great's generals, Antioch's geographic, military and economic location, particularly the spice trade, the Silk Road, the Persian Royal Road, benefited its occupants, and eventually it rivaled Alexandria as the chief city of the Near East and as the main center of Hellenistic Judaism at the end of the Second Temple period. Antioch is called "the cradle of Christianity," for the pivotal early role it played in the emergence of the faith. It was one of the four cities of the Syrian tetrapolis. Its residents are known as Antiochenes. Once a great metropolis of half a million people, it declined to insignificance during the Middle Ages because of warfare, repeated earthquakes and a change in trade routes following the Mongol conquests, which then no longer passed through Antioch from the far east.6th Century Antioch
RL88044. Bronze maiorina, RIC IX Antioch 40(b)2, LRBC II 2719, SRCV V 20265, Cohen VIII 22, Hunter V -, Choice gVF, glossy black patina, highlighting earthen deposits, scattered areas of minor porosity, weight 4.980 g, maximum diameter 22.9 mm, die axis 0o, 5th officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 378 - 383 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS P F AVG, pearl-diademed, helmeted, draped and cuirassed bust right holding spear and shield; reverse GLORIA ROMANORVM (glory of the Romans), Emperor standing slightly left on galley, head right, wearing helmet and military garb, paludamentum flying behind, raising right hand in salute, Victory seated steering at stern, wreath left, cross upper right, ANTE in exergue; $70.00 (61.60)


Valentinian II, 17 November 375 - 15 May 392 A.D.

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Valentinian II tried to restrain the despoiling of pagan temples in Rome. Buoyed by this instruction, pagan senators, led by Aurelius Symmachus, the Prefect of Rome, petitioned in 384 for the restoration of the Altar of Victory in the Senate House, which had been removed by Gratian in 382. Valentinian, at the insistence of Ambrose, refused the request and, in so doing, rejected the traditions and rituals of pagan Rome.
RL88046. Bronze centenionalis, RIC IX Antioch 51.1, LRBC II 2670 corr. (no star), SRCV V 20330, Cohen VIII 80, Choice VF, dark patina, earthen highlighting, slightest porosity, weight 2.351 g, maximum diameter 18.5 mm, die axis 180o, 2nd officina, Antioch (Antakya, Turkey) mint, 9 Aug 378 - 25 Aug 383 A.D.; obverse D N VALENTINIANVS IVN P F AVG, pearl-diademed, draped, and cuirassed bust right; reverse VRBS ROMA (City of Rome), Roma seated left on cuirass, Victory on globe offering wreath in right hand, spear vertical behind in left hand, star right, ANTB in exergue; $70.00 (61.60)




  







Catalog current as of Thursday, December 12, 2019.
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The Late Roman Empire