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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Greek Coins| ▸ |Hellenistic Monarchies| ▸ |Macedonian Kingdom||View Options:  |  |  |   

Macedonian Kingdom

Judah, Macedonian or Ptolemaic Rule, Satrap Hezekiah, c. 333 - 301 B.C.

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Josephus identifies Hezekiah as the High Priest of the Jews who offered friendship to Ptolemy I after his conquest of Palestine. Josephus mentions Hezekiah was sixty years old at the time of Ptolemy. Mildenberg identifies the head right on the obverse of this type as Ptolemy I.
SL89836. Silver half ma'ah, Hendin 1066; Meshorer TJC 25; Meshore AJC I 12; Mildenberg Yehud p. 189 & pl. 22, 23; HGC 10 452 (R1 - R2), NGC NGC XF, strike 2/5, surface 3/5 (4283488-002), weight 0.189 g, maximum diameter 7.2 mm, die axis 90o, Jerusalem(?) mint, c. 375 - 333 B.C.; obverse male head (Ptolemy I?) right; reverse forepart of winged and horned lynx left; Aramaic inscription lower right: YHZQYH (Hezekiah); NGC certified with photo certificate of authenticity, not in a plastic holder; rare; $800.00 (€704.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Seleucus I Nikator as Satrap, 311 - 305 B.C., Babylon, Babylonia

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91518. Silver stater, Houghton-Lorber 88.2a; Newell ESM 263; BMC Arabia p. 188, 43; Traite II, p. 487, 774; Weber 8202; HGC 9 67a , Choice F, well centered, old cabinet toning, light marks areas of light etching, tiny edge split, weight 13.518 g, maximum diameter 26.6 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon II (Hillah, Iraq) mint, c. 311 - 303 B.C.; obverse Baaltarz enthroned left on seat without back, himation over left shoulder and around hips and legs, lotus tipped scepter vertical before him in right hand, left hand rests on seat; reverse lion standing left, anchor (control symbol) above, nothing in exergue; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection, ex Hesperia Art; scarce; $780.00 (€686.40)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Philip III Arrhidaeus, 323 - 317 B.C.

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Struck in the name of King Philip III Arrhidaeus, Alexander the Great's half-brother, under the regent Perdikkas. Philip III and Alexander's infant son, Alexander IV, were made joint kings after Alexander's death. Philip was the bastard son of Philip II and a dancer, Philinna of Larissa. Alexander the Great's mother, Olympias, allegedly poisoned her stepson Philip III as a child, leaving him mentally disabled, eliminating him as a rival to Alexander. Neither Philip III nor Alexander IV was capable of actual rule and both were selected only to serve as pawns. The regents held power, while Philip III was actually imprisoned. In 317, Philip was murdered by Olympias to ensure the succession of her grandson.
SL89735. Silver drachm, Price P56, SNG München 947, SNG Cop 1105, HGC 3.1, 974e (S), Müller Alexander -, SNG Alpha Bank -, NGC MS, 5/5 strike, 5/5 surface, fine style (4629644-013), weight 4.26 g, maximum diameter 15.6 mm, die axis 0o, Ionia, Magnesia ad Maeandrum (near Tekin, Turkey) mint, struck under Menander or Kleito, c. 323 - 319 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, feet on footstool, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, IAT monogram left, ΦIΛIΠΠOY downward on right; ex Giessener Munzhandlung D. Gorny GmbH; $750.00 (€660.00)
 


Eastern Celts, Imitative of Philip II of Macedonia, "Dachreiter" Type, 2nd - 1st Century B.C.

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Although the body and head of the horseman on the prototype drachm of Philip III of Macedonia have been replaced by an S-shaped line over three pellets, the horseman's leg can still be found on the side of the horse!
SH89462. Silver tetradrachm, Göbl OTA tf. 15, 170/4; Lanz 448, aVF, light toning, reverse slightly off center, light marks, weight 11.953 g, maximum diameter 21.7 mm, die axis 0o, tribal mint, 2nd - 1st century B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Zeus right; reverse stylized horseman prancing left, rider's head and body reduced to an S-shaped line over three pellets, leg of horseman on side of the horse; $600.00 (€528.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Antigonus II Gonatas, 277 - 239 B.C.

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Antigonus II Gonatas was a powerful ruler who solidified the position of the Antigonid dynasty in Macedon after a long period defined by anarchy and chaos and acquired fame for his victory over the Gauls who had invaded the Balkans. He was the grandson of Antigonus I Monophthalmus, who then controlled much of Asia. His maternal grandfather was Antipater. who controlled Macedonia and the rest of Greece and was recognized as regent of the empire, which in theory remained united.
SL89733. Silver drachm, Panagopoulou 152; AMNG III-2 p. 187, 5; SNG Cop 1203; SNG Mün 1079; SNG Alpha Bank 984; SNG Lockett 1526; SNG Berry 360; HGC 3.1 1044 (R3), NGC Ch VF, strike 4/5, surface 3/5 (4629570-003), weight 3.59 g, maximum diameter 15.9 mm, die axis 0o, Pella mint, 272 - 239 B.C.; obverse wreathed head of Poseidon right; reverse Athena Alkidemos advancing left, brandishing thunderbolt in right hand, shield decorated with aegis on left arm, Macedonian helmet inner left, TI inner right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ (Greek: king) downward on right, ANTIΓONOY downward on left; ex CNG Triton IX (10 Jan 2006), lot 829 (realized $600 plus fees); ex Robert Weimer Collection; very rare; $600.00 (€528.00)
 


Seleukid Kingdom, Seleukos I Nikator, 312 - 281 B.C., Babylonia, In the Name of Alexander the Great

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Seleukos (Seleucus) founded the Seleukid Empire and the Seleukid dynasty which ruled Syria until Pompey made it a Roman province in 63 B.C. Seleukos was never one of Alexander the Great's principal generals but he commanded the royal bodyguard during the Indian campaign. In the division of the empire after Alexander's death Seleukos did not receive a satrapy. Instead, he served under the regent Perdikkas until the latter's murder in 321 or 320. Seleukos was then appointed satrap of Babylonia. Five years later Antigonus Monophthalmus (the One-eyed) forced him to flee, but he returned with support from Ptolemy. He later added Persia and Media to his territory and defeated both Antigonus and Lysimachus. He was succeeded by his son Antiochus I.
GS91995. Silver tetradrachm, Houghton-Lorber I 82.2d, Price 3756, SNG Saroglos 649, Müller Alexander 741, HGC 9 10f, SNG Cop -, SNG Alpha Bank -, SNG München -, VF, superb style in sculptural high-relief, light marks, graffiti on reverse upper left, tight flan, obverse off center, weight 17.110 g, maximum diameter 26.4 mm, die axis 90o, Mesopotamia, Babylon (Hillah, Iraq) mint, 311 - 300 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse Zeus Aëtophoros enthroned left, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, right foot drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, MI over crescent horns upward in left field, MYHP monogram within wreath under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward behind, BAΣIΛEΩΣ in exergue; ex FORVM (2009); $500.00 (€440.00)
 


Macedonian Kingdom, Alexander the Great, 336 - 323 B.C., Lifetime Issue

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Lifetime issue. This coin was issued during the lifetime and rule of Alexander the Great. Most Alexander coins were issued after his death.
SH91464. Silver tetradrachm, Price 104, Müller Alexander 368, Demanhur 909 - 966, SNG Cop 678, Newell Reattribution 37, SNG München 266, SNG Cop 678, SNG Alpha Bank -, Choice VF, full border strike, toned, bumps, scratches, weight 17.096 g, maximum diameter 26.1 mm, die axis 270o, Macedonia, Amphipolis mint, struck under Antipater, c. 325 - 323 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean Lion skin, scalp over head, forepaws tied at neck; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY clockwise from 1:30, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left on throne without back, right leg forward (archaic lifetime style), nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, cornucopia in left field; from the Maxwell Hunt Collection; $550.00 SALE |PRICE| $495.00
 


Arados, Phoenicia, 200 - 190 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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In 259 B.C., Arados increased her autonomy and dominated a federation of nearby cities including Gabala, Karne, Marathos and Simyra. Thus began the era of Aradus, to which the subsequent coins of the city are dated. Arados was not completely independent, however, the Seleukids retained overlordship.

Arados struck Alexandrine tetradrachms with a palm tree left and Phoenician dates from 243 to 205 B.C. and then with Greek dates from 202 to 167 B.C. They were not struck every year.
GS85703. Silver tetradrachm, Price 3390 ff., Mektepini 614 ff.; Duyrat 1270 ff., Cohen Dated 771, gVF, attractive style, reverse double struck, earthen encrustations, weight 17.039 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 0o, Arados (Arwad, Syria) mint, c. 200 - 190 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY BAΣIΛEΩΣ, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, palm tree with two bunches of dates in left field under arm, AP monogram under throne, uncertain Greek additive date (60 - 69?) below; $380.00 (€334.40)
 


Mesembria, Thrace, c. 250 - 175 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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Mesembria, Nesebar Bulgaria today, was a Doric settlement on a Black Sea island just off mainland Thrace. Thrace was invaded by the Galatians in 279 B.C. Only the wealthy coastal cities, including Mesembria, withstood their attacks. Following that chaos, rule of Thrace was divided between many tribes. Philip V, 221 - 179 B.C., tried to regain control of the area for the Macedonian Kingdom, but his success was limited and short lived. Mesembria was taken by Mithradates VI in the First Mithradatic War and surrendered to Rome in 71 B.C. The city struck Alexandrine tetradrachms as early as 275 B.C., more than 50 years after Alexander's death, and probably issued the very last Alexandrine tetradrachms struck anywhere, possibly under Roman rule as late as 65 B.C.
SH91294. Silver tetradrachm, Karayotov p. 83 & pl. VI, 21 - 22 (O7/R10, same die break on exergue line); Price 992; Müller Alexander 436, Mektepini 9, HGC 3.2 1567 (R1), VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, light toning, weight 17.003 g, maximum diameter 27.7 mm, die axis 30o, Mesambria (Nesebar, Bulgaria) mint, c. 250 - 175 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on right, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on left, Zeus Aëtophoros seated left, nude to waist, himation around hips and legs, right leg drawn back, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, Corinthian helmet right over (ΠA monogram) in inner left field under arm; $350.00 (€308.00)
 


Odessos, Thrace, c. 280 - 200 B.C., Civic Issue in the Types and Name of Alexander the Great

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Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) was created when Miletian Greeks founded an apoikia (trading post) at an existing Thracian settlement around 600 B.C. Odessos was in the Delian league in the 5th century B.C. Philip II besieged it unsuccessfully in 339. Getae priests persuaded him to make a treaty but the city surrendered to his son Alexander the Great in 335. In 313 B.C., in coalition with other Pontic cities and the Getae, Odessos rebelled against Lysimachus. After Lysimachus' death in 281, the city reverted to striking in the types and names of Alexander the Great and continued to strike Alexandrine tetradrachms until at least 70 B.C. After the Battle of Pydna in 168 B.C., Thrace passed to Rome. The Thracians, however, did not all readily accept Roman dominion. Several revolts occurred. The next century and a half saw the slow development of Thracia into a permanent Roman client state.
SH91295. Silver tetradrachm, Black Sea Hoard 311 - 312 (OK/R32), Price 1160, AMNG II 2116, HGC 3.2 1584, Müller Alexander -, VF, attractive style, well centered and struck, tight flan, light toning, weight 16.621 g, maximum diameter 29.2 mm, die axis 0o, Odessos (Varna, Bulgaria) mint, c. 280 - 200 B.C.; obverse head of Herakles right, wearing Nemean lion-scalp headdress; reverse Zeus seated left on throne without back, nude to the waist, himation around hips and legs, eagle in extended right hand, long scepter vertical behind in left hand, right leg drawn back, K∆ monogram (magistrate) below arm, O∆H Odessos monogram under throne, AΛEΞAN∆POY downward on left, BAΣIΛEΩΣ downward on right; $350.00 (€308.00)
 




  



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REFERENCES|

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Head, B. British Museum Catalogue of Greek Coins, Macedonia, etc. (London, 1879).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Denmark, The Royal Collection of Coins and Medals, Danish National Museum, Vol. 2: Macedonia and Thrace. (West Milford, NJ, 1982).
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Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece II, The Alpha Bank Collection, Macedonia I: Alexander I - Perseus. (Athens, 2000).
Sylloge Nummorum Graecorum, Greece IV, Numismatic Museum, Athens, The Petros Z. Saroglos Collection, Part 1: Macedonia. (Athens, 2005).
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Westermark, U. "Remarks on the Regal Macedonian Coinage ca. 413-359 BC" in Kraay-Mørkholm Essays.

Catalog current as of Monday, September 16, 2019.
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Coins of the Macedonian Kingdom