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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |150-100 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Republic 150 - 100 B.C.

Roman Republic, L. Caecilius Metellus Diadematus, 128 B.C.

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In 128 B.C., the Greco-Bactrian kingdom was overrun by the Tocharians and renamed Tocharistan.
RR89756. Silver denarius, RSC I Caecilia 38, Crawford 262/1, Sydenham 496, BMCRR I Rome 1044, Russo RBW 1060, SRCV I 138, VF, broad flan, light toning, flow lines, some die wear, weight 3.926 g, maximum diameter 194 mm, die axis 270o, Rome mint, 128 B.C.; obverse head of Roma right in winged helmet, X (XVI ligature = 16 asses) behind, wearing single drop earring and pearl necklace; reverse Pax driving a galloping biga right, olive branch in right hand, reins and scepter in left hand, elephant head with bell at neck below, ROMA in exergue; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Roman Republic, Manius Aquillius, 109 - 108 B.C.

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Manius Aquillius, would become a Roman general, and consul in 101 B.C. He successfully put down a revolt of the slaves in Sicily but was accused of extortion in the province. He was acquitted on account of his military services, although there was little doubt of his guilt. In the First Mithridatic War he was defeated and taken prisoner in 88 B.C. Mithradates treated him with great cruelty, and is said to have put him to death by pouring molten gold down his throat. The method of his execution became famous and, according to some accounts, was repeated by Parthian contemporaries to kill Marcus Licinius Crassus who was at the time the richest man in Rome and a member of the First Triumvirate.
RR92013. Silver denarius, Crawford 303/1, Sydenham 557, BMCRR Italy 645, RSC I Aquillia 1, SRCV I 180, RBW Collection -, Choice VF/F, darker spots, mild porosity, light marks, weight 3.899 g, maximum diameter 20.2 mm, die axis 225o, Rome mint, 109 - 108 B.C.; obverse radiate head of Sol right, X (mark of value) below chin; reverse Luna in a fast biga right, three stars and crescent above, star over MN AQVIL (MN in monogram) below, ROMA in exergue; ex Harlan J. Berk; $200.00 (€176.00)
 


Roman Macedonia, "Thasian" Type, c. 148 - 80 B.C.

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This Dionysos / Herakles type was first struck by Thasos itself on the island and in its continental territories in the South of the Balkans, c. 168 - 148 B.C. After Rome took control of the area, "Thasian" types were struck by Roman authorities, c. 148 - 80 B.C., mainly in Macedonia but also, perhaps, by mobile military mints on campaigns. Imitatives were also struck by at least several tribal groups (mainly Celtic or mixed enclaves) from as early as 120 - 100 B.C. to about 20 - 10 B.C.
GS79630. Silver tetradrachm, Prokopov Thasos, group XII, monogram 6, 743 (O AC8 / R 592); SNG Cop 1040 ff. (Thasos), VF, toned, bumps and marks, die wear, weight 16.745 g, maximum diameter 32.8 mm, die axis 0o, Roman provincial or military mint, c. 148 - 80 B.C.; obverse head of Dionysos right, wearing taenia and wreathed in flowering ivy; reverse HPAKΛEOYΣ ΣΩTHPOΣ ΘAΣIΩN, Herakles standing half left, nude but for Nemean lion's skin on left arm, resting right hand on grounded club before him, left hand on hip, (MH monogram) inner left; $175.00 (€154.00)
 


Roman Republic, Unofficial, c. 169 - 91 B.C.

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Crawford notes, "The very common quadrantes with M • and N• (as Milan 351) are clearly unofficial."
RR79715. Copper quadrans, cf. Milan 351 (from Crawford appendix p. 309 unofficial issues of bronze coins), Sydenham -, VF, centered on a tight flan, light marks,, weight 4.182 g, maximum diameter 18.2 mm, die axis 135o, unofficial mint, c. 169 - 91 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow right, ROMA below, three pellets before, M• above; ex Forum (2006), ex Goodman collection; $125.00 (€110.00)
 


Roman Republic, M. Marcius Mn.f., 134 B.C.

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The First Servile War, 135 - 132 B.C., was an unsuccessful slave rebellion against the Roman Republic. The war was prompted by slave revolts in Enna on the island of Sicily. It was led by Eunus, a former slave claiming to be a prophet, and Cleon, a Cilician (from present-day Turkey) who became Eunus's military commander. After some minor battles won by the slaves, a larger Roman army arrived in Sicily and defeated the rebels.
RR88355. Bronze quadrans, Crawford 245/3, Sydenham 501a, BMCRR I Rome 1017, RBW Collection 1011, SRCV I 1151, aF, dark green patina, corrosion, edge crack, weight 5.255 g, maximum diameter 19.1 mm, die axis 315o, Rome mint, 134 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion's scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, M MARCI / MN F (MAR and MNF ligate) in two lines above, three pellets before, ROMA in exergue; ex Rudnik Numismatics, with an old collector tag dated 30 November 1932, with the cost noted as $.25; $120.00 (€105.60)
 


Roman Republic, Anonymous, c. 135 - 100 B.C.

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RR72284. Copper quadrans, McCabe Anonymous group L1.Qd.1, BMCRR I Rome 1196, F, weight 1.878 g, maximum diameter 16.5 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, c. 135 - 100 B.C.; obverse head of Hercules right, wearing Nemean Lion scalp headdress, three pellets behind; reverse prow of galley right, three pellets before, ROMA below; $55.00 (€48.40)
 


Roman Republic, c. 157 - 145 B.C.

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In Roman mythology, Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, and of beginnings and endings. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88013. Bronze as, cf. RBW Collection 848, Crawford 197 - 198B/b1, Sydenham -, Fair, dark patina, red earthen encrustation, porosity, weight 18.372 g, maximum diameter 31.7 mm, die axis 90o, unofficial(?) mint, c. 157 - 145 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I (mark of value) above; reverse war galley prow right, I (mark of value) right, ROMA below; $50.00 (€44.00)
 


La monetazione di Roma durante la Repubblica col prezzario delle monete

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BK50735. La monetazione di Roma durante la Repubblica col prezzario delle monete by Cesare Gamberini di Scarfèa, special order, Bologna, 1973, 145 pages, 6 plates, Forni reprint; $36.00 (€31.68)
 


Roman Republic, Quintus Marcius Libo, 148 B.C. (Perhaps a Later Imitative)

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Janus (or Ianus) was the god of gates, doors, doorways, beginnings and endings. He is most often depicted as having two faces or heads, facing in opposite directions. Janus is believed to be one of the few major deities in Roman mythology that does not have a Greek origin or counterpart.
RR88441. Bronze as, cf. Crawford 215/2b, RBW Collection 917, Sydenham 396a, SRCV I 724, Fair, rough, weight 18.116 g, maximum diameter 30.8 mm, die axis 135o, Rome mint, 148 B.C.; obverse laureate head of bearded Janus, I above; reverse prow right, Q. MARC above (MA ligate), LIBO or I before, ROMA below; $18.00 (€15.84)
 







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REFERENCES|

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Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
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Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006) pp. 321-356.
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De Ruyter, P. "Denarii of the Roman Republican Moneyer Lucius Julius Bursio, a Die Analysis" in NC 156 (1996), p. 79 - 121, pl. 21 - 22.
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Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 81 BCE - 64 BCE. (Citrus Heights, CA, 2012).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
McCabe, A. "The Anonymous Struck Bronze Coinage of the Roman Republic: A Provisional Arrangement" in Essays Russo.
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
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Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Saturday, August 17, 2019.
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Roman Republic Coins of 150-100 B.C.