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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Roman Republic| ▸ |after 50 B.C.||View Options:  |  |  | 

Roman Republic after 50 B.C.

The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C.

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THE HISTORY AND COINAGE OF THE ROMAN IMPERATORS 49-27 BC by David Sear

The brief period covered in this book witnessed the violent transition of the Roman state from a republican constitution, presided over by the Senate, to a full military autocracy under the control of one man, the Emperor Augustus. In reality, the events of these years were merely the culmination of a movement which had been gathering strength over the preceding half-century, since the rise of men such as Marius and Sulla. Caesar had put events into motion by his invasion of Italy and his challenge to Pompey's dominant position in Roman politics. With his assassination on the Ides of March, 44 B.C., Caesar's role was inherited by his youthful great-nephew Octavian who, against seemingly hopeless odds, succeeded in eliminating his rivals for supreme power, notably Mark Antony and his ambitious consort Cleopatra, queen of Egypt. This book traces in detail the unfolding of this drama. Each of its six chapters includes a comprehensive catalogue listing of all the relevant coin types and varieties, each with a full discussion of its significance in the interpretation of the events of the period. Information on the rarity of each type, including estimates of current value, is presented in a separate table. The numerous, though less precisely understood, local coinages of the Imperatorial period are listed in an extensive appendix. Whilst providing a comprehensive numismatic reference work for the age of transition from Republic to Empire the author has also aimed to heighten the historian's awareness of the vital role which may be played by the numismatic evidence in the detailed chronicling of event.
BK43171. The History and Coinage of the Roman Imperators 49-27 B.C. by David R. Sear, a detailed survey including valuations for collectors, 1998, 360 pages, illustrated throughout, hardback; $140.00 (€123.20)
 


Gnaeus Pompey Junior, Imperator, 47 - 45 B.C., Son of Pompey the Great

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After the murder of his father, Gnaeus Pompey Magnus Junior and his brother Sextus joined the resistance against Caesar in Africa. Together with Metellus Scipio, Cato the Younger and other senators, they prepared to oppose Caesar and his army. Caesar defeated Metellus Scipio and Cato, who subsequently committed suicide, at the Battle of Thapsus in 46 B.C. Gnaeus escaped to the Balearic Islands, where he joined Sextus. Together with Titus Labienus, former general in Caesar's army, the Pompey brothers crossed over to the Hispania, where they raised yet another army. Caesar soon followed and, on 17 March 45 B.C., the armies met in the battle of Munda. Both armies were large and led by able generals. The battle was closely fought, but eventually a cavalry charge by Caesar turned events to his side. In the battle and the panicked escape that followed, Titus Labienus and an estimated 30,000 men of the Pompeian side died. Gnaeus and Sextus managed to escape once again. However, this time, supporters were difficult to find because it was now clear Caesar had won the civil war. Within a few weeks, Gnaeus Pompeius was caught and executed for treason.
RR88024. Leaded bronze as, Crawford 471/1, Sydenham 1040, RPC I 486, BMCRR Spain 84, RBW Collection, 1646, Sear CRI 53, Cohen I 16, SRCV I 1386, aF, dark patina, porous, earthen encrustations, weight 23.210 g, maximum diameter 31.0 mm, die axis 240o, Hispania probably Tarraco (Tarragona, Spain) mint, 46 - 45 B.C.; obverse laureate and bearded head of Janus, I above; reverse prow of galley right, I right, CN MAG (MA ligate) above, IMP below; scarce; $50.00 (€44.00)
 


La monetazione di Roma durante la Repubblica col prezzario delle monete

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BK50735. La monetazione di Roma durante la Repubblica col prezzario delle monete by Cesare Gamberini di Scarfèa, special order, Bologna, 1973, 145 pages, 6 plates, Forni reprint; $36.00 (€31.68)
 


Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 86 and 94, Gasvoda Collection, Oct 2015 and 2016

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The Gasvoda Collection Part 1, 8 October 2015, and Part 2, 6 October 2016. Coins of the Imperatorial Period and the Twelve Caesars.
BC15802. Numismatica ARS Classica Auction 86 and 94, The Gasvoda Collection Part 1, 8 Oct 2015, and Part 2, 6 Oct 2016, 2 auctions, 2 catalogs, softcover, 87 pages, 382 lots, illustrated, good condition, only one copy available, international shipping at the actual cost of postage; $18.00 (€15.84)
 







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REFERENCES|

Albert, R. Die Münzen der römischen Republik. (Regenstauf, 2003).
Babelon, E. Monnaies de la Republique Romaine. (Paris, 1885).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Berger, F. Die Münzen der Römischen Republik im Kestner-Museum Hannover. (Hannover, 1989).
Buttrey, T. "The Denarii of P. Crepusius and Roman Republican Mint Organization" in ANSMN 21 (1976), p. 67-108.
Carson, R. Principal Coins of the Romans, Vol. I: The Republic, c. 290-31 BC. (London, 1978).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappées sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 1: Pompey to Domitian. (Paris, 1880).
Coin Hoards of the Roman Republic Online - http://numismatics.org/chrr/
Crawford, M. Roman Republican Coinage. (Cambridge, 1974).
Davis, P. "Dacian Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii" in Apvlvm Number XLIII/1. (2006) pp. 321-356.
Davis, P. Imitations of Roman Republican Denarii, website: http://rrimitations.ancients.info/
De Ruyter, P. "Denarii of the Roman Republican Moneyer Lucius Julius Bursio, a Die Analysis" in NC 156 (1996), p. 79 - 121, pl. 21 - 22.
Grueber, H. Coins of the Roman Republic in The British Museum. (London, 1910).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 63 BC - 49 BC. (London, 1995).
Harlan, M. Roman Republican Moneyers and Their Coins, 81 BCE - 64 BCE. (Citrus Heights, CA, 2012).
Hoover, O. Handbook of Coins of Sicily (including Lipara), Civic, Royal, Siculo-Punic, and Romano-Sicilian Issues, Sixth to First Centuries BC. HGC 2. (Lancaster, PA, 2011).
Russo, R. The RBW Collection of Roman Republican Coins. (Zurich, 2013).
Rutter, N. ed. Historia Numorum. Italy. (London, 2001).
Seaby, H., D. Sear, & R. Loosley. Roman Silver Coins, Volume I, The Republic to Augustus. (London, 1989).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values, Volume One, The Republic and the Twelve Caesars 280 BC - AD 86. (London, 2000).
Sydenham, E. The Coinage of the Roman Republic. (London, 1952).

Catalog current as of Thursday, December 12, 2019.
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Roman Republic after 50 B.C.