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Home ▸ Catalog ▸ |Roman Coins| ▸ |Crisis and Decline| ▸ |Maximinus I||View Options:  |  |  | 

Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D.

Maximinus I was a giant of a man, and possessed of natural fighting ability. He rose through the ranks of the Roman army during the reign of Severus Alexander. After a successful governorship in Mesopotamia, he was sent to the Rhine frontier to oversee the regions army recruitment levies. In 235 A.D. he was proclaimed emperor by troops offended by Severus Alexander's peace loving character, and the galling fact that his mother, Julia Mamaea, was the true power in the empire. Maximinus campaigned with great success against the Germanic tribes, but his great cruelty towards the nobility whom he hated, and general ruthlessness inspired several rebellions, notably the failed Gordian rebellion and then the rebellion of Balbinus and Pupienus. Maximinus marched against the latter two, and during the abortive siege of Aquileia his troops deserted and murdered him.


Maximinus I Thrax, March 235 - May 238 A.D., Roman Provincial Egypt

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In Greek mythology, Selene is the goddess of the moon. She is the daughter of the Titans Hyperion and Theia, and sister of the sun-god Helios, and Eos, goddess of the dawn. She drives her moon chariot across the heavens. Several lovers are attributed to her in various myths, including Zeus, Pan, and the mortal Endymion. In classical times, Selene was often identified with Artemis, much as her brother, Helios, was identified with Apollo. Selene and Artemis were also associated with Hecate, and all three were regarded as lunar goddesses, but only Selene was regarded as the personification of the moon itself. Her Roman equivalent is Luna.
RP89035. Billon tetradrachm, Dattari (Savio) 4601; BMC Alexandria p. 228, 1775; Milne 3267; Kampmann 65.73; Emmett 3300.1; SNG Cop -; Geissen -, aVF, full border centering on a broad flan, dark brown patina, mild corrosion, edge cracks, weight 12.190 g, maximum diameter 23.9 mm, die axis 0o, Alexandria mint, 29 Aug 237 - 28 Aug 238 A.D.; obverse AVTO MAΞIMINOC CEV CEB, laureate, draped, and cuirassed bust of Maximinus I right, seen from behind; reverse head of Selene right, wearing tainia and chiton fastened on left shoulder with a fibula, L∆ (year four) behind, large crescent right with horns left; ex CGB mail bid sale 13 (30 Jul 2001), lot 557; $145.00 (127.60)


Maximinus I Thrax and Maximus Caesar, 20 March 235 - late May 238 A.D., Flaviopolis, Cilicia

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Flaviopolis was founded in 74 A.D. by Vespasian, as part of an imperial program for the urbanization of the Cilician Plain. Until then the rural hinterland, as well as the city of Anazarbos, was probably administered by the Tracondimotid dynasty from Hieropolis Castabala. Some mosaic floors, inscriptions, and building blocks have been found at Kadirli, and a 6th century church has been excavated. Flaviopolis was bishopric of Cilicia Secunda in the Christian era.
RP92397. Bronze AE 34, RPC VI online T7466 (15 spec.), SNG BnF 2196, SNG Levante 1553, SNGvA 5565, SNG Pfalz 517, F/aF, well centered, nice portraits for the grade, porous, weight 16.432 g, maximum diameter 34.3 mm, die axis 180o, Flaviopolis mint, 235 - 236 A.D.; obverse AYT K Γ IOY OYH MAΞIMEINOC Γ I OYH MAΞIMOC K, laureate and draped bust of Maximinus I right (on left), confronting radiate and draped bust of Maximus left; reverse FΛAVIOΠOΛEITWN, Serapis seated facing, sacrificing from patera in right hand over lighted altar on left, cornucopia in left hand, amphora at feet on left, crater at feet on right, ET ΓΞP (year 163) in exergue; rare; $120.00 (105.60)


Maximinus I Thrax, 20 March 235 - Late May 238 A.D., Pella, Macedonia

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Pella was founded in 399 B.C. by King Archelaus (413 - 399 B.C.) as his capital. It is best known as the historical capital of the ancient Greek kingdom of Macedon and birthplace of Alexander the Great. In 168 B.C., it was sacked by the Romans, and its treasury transported to Rome. Later the city was destroyed by an earthquake. By 180 A.D., Lucian could describe it in passing as "now insignificant, with very few inhabitants."
RP92878. Bronze AE 26, Varbanov III 3747 (R5); SNG Cop 285; Moushmov 6486; cf. BMC Macedonia p. 40, 40 (cuirassed bust); SNG ANS -; SNG Hunter -; AMNG III -, aVF, well centered, green patina, light deposits, light marks, part of reverse legend weak, weight 9.387 g, maximum diameter 25.7 mm, die axis 180o, Pella mint, 20 Mar 235 - late May 238 A.D.; obverse IMP C C IVL VER MAXIMINVS, laureate and cuirassed bust right, from behind; reverse COL IVL AVG PELLA, Pan seated left on rock, nude, right hand on top of head, pedum in left hand, syrnix (Pan flute) in left field ; $110.00 (96.80)







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|OBVERSE |LEGENDS

IMPMAXIMINVSPIVSAVG
MAXIMINVSPIVSAVGGERM


REFERENCES|

Alram, A. Die Mnzprgung der Kaiser Maximinus I Thrax (235 / 238). (Wien, 1989).
Banti, A. & L. Simonetti. Corpus Nummorum Romanorum. (Florence, 1972-1979).
Cohen, H. Description historique des monnaies frappes sous l'Empire Romain, Vol. 4: Septimius Severus to Maximinus Thrax. (Paris, 1884).
Mattingly, H., E. Sydenham & C. Sutherland. The Roman Imperial Coinage, Vol IV, From Pertinax to Uranius Antoninus. (London, 1986).
Mattingly, H. & R. Carson. Coins of the Roman Empire in the British Museum, Vol. 6: Severus Alexander to Pupienus. (London, 1963).
Robinson, A. Roman Imperial Coins in the Hunter Coin Cabinet, University of Glasgow, Vol. III. Pertinax to Aemilian. (Oxford, 1977).
Seaby, H. & D. Sear. Roman Silver Coins, Volume III, Pertinax to Balbinus and Pupienus. (London, 1982).
Sear, D. Roman Coins and Their Values III, The Accession of Maximinus I to the Death of Carinus AD 235 - AD 285. (London, 2005).
Vagi, D. Coinage and History of the Roman Empire. (Sidney, 1999).

Catalog current as of Sunday, October 20, 2019.
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Roman Coins of Maximinus I